The Most Liturgical Reformed Denomination

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Javilo

Puritan Board Freshman
I prefer liturgical worship services so can anyone help me with what is the
most liturgical reformed/calvinistic denomination(s)? Seems that most are
not. For example, using the chalice for the Lord's supper and also
kneeling at the communion rail which I believe shows more reverence.
Probably no such thing among reformed churches but just wondering.
Thanks.
 

Wayne

Tempus faciendi, Domine.
I would recommend that you first seek to acquire a solid understanding of what constitutes the proper worship of God.

Get and study:
On the Necessity of Reforming the Church, by John Calvin
Gospel Worship, by Jeremiah Burroughs
The Ten Commandments, by Thomas Watson, reading his section on the 2d Commandment
and The Westminster Larger Catechism on the 2d Commandment

There is much more to recommend, but those few would provide a good start.

The heart of the matter, as you will read in the works noted above, is that it is God's prerogative to determine how He shall be worshiped. Anything other than the worship that He commands is idolatry. Or to understate the matter, To simply adopt a given practice because you have a preference for it is not a sufficient reason, and it is a disservice first and foremost to God, but also to yourself and those around you.
 

Curt

Puritan Board Graduate
I would recommend that you first seek to acquire a solid understanding of what constitutes the proper worship of God.

Get and study:
On the Necessity of Reforming the Church, by John Calvin
Gospel Worship, by Jeremiah Burroughs
The Ten Commandments, by Thomas Watson, reading his section on the 2d Commandment
and The Westminster Larger Catechism on the 2d Commandment

There is much more to recommend, but those few would provide a good start.

The heart of the matter, as you will read in the works noted above, is that it is God's prerogative to determine how He shall be worshiped. Anything other than the worship that He commands is idolatry. Or to understate the matter, To simply adopt a given practice because you have a preference for it is not a sufficient reason, and it is a disservice first and foremost to God, but also to yourself and those around you.

Well said, Wayne.
 

Poimen

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
I prefer liturgical worship services so can anyone help me with what is the
most liturgical reformed/calvinistic denomination(s)? Seems that most are
not. For example, using the chalice for the Lord's supper and also
kneeling at the communion rail which I believe shows more reverence.
Probably no such thing among reformed churches but just wondering.
Thanks.

First of all I believe there is a problem with your definition of 'liturgical'. Though your examples may be what some consider liturgy others would merely consider them to be the external trappings of particular traditions of worship. So by defining them as liturgy it would require those who oppose such traditions to say that they are not liturgical when, in fact, all churches adhere to some kind of liturgy, even if only loosely defined.

Second, I know of no Reformed church that practices such things but I do know many Reformed churches that hold to a particular form of worship.
 

Glenn Ferrell

Puritan Board Junior
You may find conservative Presbyterian bodies which use a common cup with real wine; for example, the Free Church of Scotland Continuing, at least in Scotland does so. I doubt you will find Presbyterians bodies which kneel for communion. This was an issue raised by John Knox when he was offered a bishopric in the Church of England during his short stay in that kingdom under Edward VI. There is no biblical warrant for receiving communion kneeling. The Passover, after entering the land of promise, was received sitting or reclining, representing the rest one has in God’s salvation. Scottish Presbyterian practice was to receive sitting at tables. There is no “altar” or communion rail in a biblical Presbyterian church.

Good advice is given above. Learn about worship according to God’s word rather than according to preference or tradition. There is always a liturgy; and liturgical practice always implies a theology. The choice is not liturgy or no liturgy; but, good (scriptural) liturgy or bad (unbiblical) liturgy.

The good elements of what is often referred to as “liturgical worship” - usually meaning Anglican or Lutheran style worship - includes time given to the reading of the word as an element in itself (i.e. more than one reading systematically taken from a broad representation of scripture), biblical prayer, prominence given to the Psalter in sung or chanted praise, dignity and reverence, and recognition of worship as a God commanded meeting with the Sovereign Lord on his terms, one will find in a Presbyterian or Reformed worship service conducted in accordance to the Regulative Principle.
 

Willem van Oranje

Puritan Board Junior
I prefer liturgical worship services so can anyone help me with what is the
most liturgical reformed/calvinistic denomination(s)? Seems that most are
not. For example, using the chalice for the Lord's supper and also
kneeling at the communion rail which I believe shows more reverence.
Probably no such thing among reformed churches but just wondering.
Thanks.

Question, what do either of these things have to do with liturgy?

---------- Post added at 10:05 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:02 PM ----------

I prefer liturgical worship services so can anyone help me with what is the
most liturgical reformed/calvinistic denomination(s)? Seems that most are
not. For example, using the chalice for the Lord's supper and also
kneeling at the communion rail which I believe shows more reverence.
Probably no such thing among reformed churches but just wondering.
Thanks.

First of all I believe there is a problem with your definition of 'liturgical'. Though your examples may be what some consider liturgy others would merely consider them to be the external trappings of particular traditions of worship. So by defining them as liturgy it would require those who oppose such traditions to say that they are not liturgical when, in fact, all churches adhere to some kind of liturgy, even if only loosely defined.

Second, I know of no Reformed church that practices such things but I do know many Reformed churches that hold to a particular form of worship.

The most liturgical Reformed church I ever attended was a URCNA. Tons and tons of responsive Bible readings seemingly without end! Not saying this is the way to go, but I loved it.
 
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