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Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
Banner of Truth is having a Reformation Day sale. There are some really good deals. The two most exciting are the works of Knox and the "Tracts and Letters" of Calvin. They are both on sale at around $100 a piece. I have been eying both for some time. Does anyone have either set that can comment on the quality of the translations? Or, any general comments in general on either set. I am torn on which set to get. Thanks!

Deo Volente,
Robert

https://banneroftruth.org/us/store/product-tag/reformation-day-special/?orderby=price-desc
 
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NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
That is a steal for the six volume Knox at 109. I had to pay significantly more than the list price for this (the Laing edition of Knox's works) and not even an original but an AMS reprint; this was back in the mid 1980s. AMS (not sure they are still around) did library quality reprints and I suspect they are even sturdier than this apparently very sturdy BoT edition. The AMS books are built like a tank. I wonder if they have the foldouts? However I do like the brown bindings on the BoT; the AMS are aqua blue.
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Brimstone
I've not really read much Knox before. Does he make any unique contributions or is this primarily for specialists? I mean, I don't think Knox is remembered for his theological genius so much as for his fiery personality and determination.
 

moral necessity

Puritan Board Junior
Calvin's has his wonderful commentary on the Council of Trent!
This was invaluable to me!

If I remember right, Knox is difficult to read because the text still has Old English spellings.

If I could have only one on my shelf, it would be Calvin.

Blessings!
 

Tom Hart

Puritan Board Senior
I have read somewhere (in M'Crie, I think, though I am not sure) that Knox himself did not see much of a need to publish many works of his own. He considered others (Calvin) much better suited to the task of such things as systematizing theology.

Knox regretted that he came late to the study of the biblical languages, and that may be one reason for which he felt himself less qualified.
 

Regi Addictissimus

Completely sold out to the King
I have read somewhere (in M'Crie, I think, though I am not sure) that Knox himself did not see much of a need to publish many works of his own. He considered others (Calvin) much better suited to the task of such things as systematizing theology.

Knox regretted that he came late to the study of the biblical languages, and that may be one reason for which he felt himself less qualified.
I know that feeling all too well. Thanks for that interesting tidbit of history.
 

NaphtaliPress

Administrator
Staff member
Knox's letters, history and contribution to the First Book of Order and Confession of Faith of 1560 are probably his most important works. He has pieces that address the regulative principle of worship (mass is idolatry, troubles at frankfurt). He does have a little known work on Predestination. His work against the monstrous regiment of women was ill timed and Knox was forced to an apology to Queen Elizabeth who was not in view or on the throne (but bloody Mary) when Knox penned it.
 
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