Things becoming obsolete list

Status
Not open for further replies.

Pergamum

Ordinary Guy (TM)
20 Things About To Become Obsolete This Decade.

Travel agents: While not dead today, this profession is one of many that’s been decimated by the Internet. When it’s time for their honeymoon, will those born in 2011 be able to find one?

The separation of work and home: When you’re carrying an email-equipped computer in your pocket, it’s not just your friends who can find you — so can your boss. For kids born this year, the wall between office and home will be blurry indeed.

Books, magazines, and newspapers: Like video tape, words written on dead trees are on their way out. Sure, there may be books — but for those born today, stores that exist solely to sell them will be as numerous as record stores are now.

Movie rental stores: You actually got in your car and drove someplace just to rent a movie?

Watches: Maybe as quaint jewelry, but the correct time is on your smartphone, which is pretty much always in your hand.

Paper maps: At one time these were available free at every gas station. They’re practically obsolete today, and the next generation will probably have to visit a museum to find one.

Wired phones: Why would you pay $35 every month to have a phone that plugs into a wall? For those born today, this will be a silly concept.

Long distance: Thanks to the Internet, the days of paying more to talk to somebody in the next city, state, or even country are limited.

Newspaper classifieds: The days are gone when you have to buy a bunch of newsprint just to see what’s for sale.

Dial-up Internet: While not everyone is on broadband, it won’t be long before dial-up Internet goes the way of the plug-in phone.

Encyclopedias: Imagine a time when you had to buy expensive books that were outdated before the ink was dry. This will be a nonsense term for babies born today.

Forgotten friends: Remember when an old friend would bring up someone you went to high school with, and you’d say, “Oh yeah, I forgot about them!” The next generation will automatically be in touch with everyone they’ve ever known even slightly via Facebook.

Forgotten anything else: Kids born this year will never know what it was like to stand in a bar and incessantly argue the unknowable. Today the world’s collective knowledge is on the computer in your pocket or purse. And since you have it with you at all times, why bother remembering anything?

The evening news: The news is on 24/7. And if you’re not home to watch it, that’s OK — it’s on the smartphone in your pocket.

CDs: First records, then 8-track, then cassette, then CDs — replacing your music collection used to be an expensive pastime. Now it’s cheap(er) and as close as the nearest Internet connection.

Film cameras: For the purist, perhaps, but for kids born today, the word “film” will mean nothing. In fact, even digital cameras — both video and still — are in danger of extinction as our pocket computers take over that function too.

Yellow and White Pages: Why in the world would you need a 10-pound book just to find someone?

Catalogs: There’s no need to send me a book in the mail when I can see everything you have for sale anywhere, anytime. If you want to remind me to look at it, send me an email.

Fax machines: Can you say “scan,” “.pdf” and “email?”

One picture to a frame: Such a waste of wall/counter/desk space to have a separate frame around each picture. Eight gigabytes of pictures and/or video in a digital frame encompassing every person you’ve ever met and everything you’ve ever done — now, that’s efficient. Especially compared to what we used to do: put our friends and relatives together in a room and force them to watch what we called a “slide show” or “home movies.”

Wires: Wires connecting phones to walls? Wires connecting computers, TVs, stereos, and other electronics to each other? Wires connecting computers to the Internet? To kids born in 2011, that will make as much sense as an electric car trailing an extension cord.

Hand-written letters: For that matter, hand-written anything. When was the last time you wrote cursive? In fact, do you even know what the word “cursive” means? Kids born in 2011 won’t — but they’ll put you to shame on a tiny keyboard.

Talking to one person at a time: Remember when it was rude to be with one person while talking to another on the phone? Kids born today will just assume that you’re supposed to use texting to maintain contact with five or six other people while pretending to pay attention to the person you happen to be physically next to.

Retirement plans: Yes, Johnny, there was a time when all you had to do was work at the same place for 20 years and they’d send you a check every month for as long as you lived. In fact, some companies would even pay your medical bills, too!

Mail: What’s left when you take the mail you receive today, then subtract the bills you could be paying online, the checks you could be having direct-deposited, and the junk mail you could be receiving as junk email? Answer: A bloated bureaucracy that loses billions of taxpayer dollars annually.

Commercials on TV: They’re terrifically expensive, easily avoided with DVRs, and inefficiently target mass audiences. Unless somebody comes up with a way to force you to watch them — as with video on the Internet — who’s going to pay for them?

Commercial music radio: Smartphones with music-streaming programs like Pandoraare a better solution that doesn’t include ads screaming between every song.

Hiding: Not long ago, if you didn’t answer your home phone, that was that — nobody knew if you were alive or dead, much less where you might be. Now your phone is not only in your pocket, it can potentially tell everyone — including advertisers — exactly where you are.


You're Out: 20 Things That Became Obsolete This Decade (PHOTOS)


A thought-provoking list.

How will this impact churches, pastors, missionaries, Christians?
 

Philip

Puritan Board Graduate
My responses

Books, magazines, and newspapers: Like video tape, words written on dead trees are on their way out. Sure, there may be books — but for those born today, stores that exist solely to sell them will be as numerous as record stores are now.

Not if I can help it.

Watches: Maybe as quaint jewelry, but the correct time is on your smartphone, which is pretty much always in your hand.

Not me, sir. Call me a young curmudgeon, but I insist on always carrying a very stylish pocket watch (my watchband broke and I was tired of replacing it).

Paper maps: At one time these were available free at every gas station. They’re practically obsolete today, and the next generation will probably have to visit a museum to find one.

If I can't mark things on it, I don't use it for directions.

but for kids born today, the word “film” will mean nothing.

Unless of course you mean the art of making motion pictures.

Hand-written letters: For that matter, hand-written anything.

So how exactly does one keep a secret journal on a computer? If anything, I am noticing more advanced handwriting and calligraphic material now than I ever have (just bought three fountain pens for awesome prices).

Mail: What’s left when you take the mail you receive today, then subtract the bills you could be paying online, the checks you could be having direct-deposited, and the junk mail you could be receiving as junk email?

The stuff I ordered on ebay, the various government forms I had to fill out, the notes from my elderly relatives.

Signed,

A young curmudgeon
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
There will always be a niche for quality music recording which simply isn't possible using digital formats.
 

jwithnell

Moderator
Staff member
Hand-written letters: For that matter, hand-written anything. When was the last time you wrote cursive? In fact, do you even know what the word “cursive” means? Kids born in 2011 won’t — but they’ll put you to shame on a tiny keyboard.

Over my dead body! Especially when it comes to thank-you notes and letters of encouragement! (And my 4-year-old already knows to do this.)
 

Peairtach

Puritan Board Doctor
Talking to one person at a time: Remember when it was rude to be with one person while talking to another on the phone? Kids born today will just assume that you’re supposed to use texting to maintain contact with five or six other people while pretending to pay attention to the person you happen to be physically next to.

This behaviour is disgraceful and the height of rudeness. Where's the Christian love in that - or any love?

Commercials on TV: They’re terrifically expensive, easily avoided with DVRs, and inefficiently target mass audiences. Unless somebody comes up with a way to force you to watch them — as with video on the Internet — who’s going to pay for them?

How can anyone force you to watch a video on the internet?
 

Marrow Man

Drunk with Powder
How can anyone force you to watch a video on the internet?

You can watch TV series and the like on the Internet (instead of TV). But when you do, you are forced to watch a video of a commercial at the beginning of the show, and sometimes commercials periodically through the show as well. Of course, you can open another tab or window while the commercial is playing, but it's usually only 15 or 30 seconds.
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Doctor
Commercials on TV: They’re terrifically expensive, easily avoided with DVRs, and inefficiently target mass audiences. Unless somebody comes up with a way to force you to watch them — as with video on the Internet — who’s going to pay for them?

We will continue to have ads everywhere. They pay for production of the content. Unless we go to some sort of pay TV or pay-per-view (and Americans don't want to do this for the most part), we will keep having commercials. There will be ways around them, but these ways will be cumbersome. Technology isn't the driving consideration here, but rather economics.



How will this impact churches, pastors, missionaries, Christians?

Already there's a growing belief that one can be a fully participating Christian without a strong commitment to one particular church. Get your favorite worship songs from here, your favorite preaching from there, and your fellowship from yet another place. Mix and match them how and when it best works for you.

On the plus side, advances in communications and connectiveness will provide incredible resources for missionary work and Christian education in remote places.
 

jwithnell

Moderator
Staff member
On the plus side, advances in communications and connectiveness will provide incredible resources for missionary work and Christian education in remote places.

This would have been such a blessing when I lived in Alaska!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top