This Week In Church History.

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Irishcat922

Puritan Board Sophomore
On January 19, 1563, the Heidelberg Catechism was published in German under the title, "œCatechismus, or Christian Instruction, as Conducted in the Churches and Schools of the Electoral Palatinate."

It was named after the German city where it was prepared by Zacharias Ursinus and Caspar Olevianus, at the request of the Elector Frederick III. Soon after it was written, it was translated into Dutch, and along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of the Synod of Dort, the Heidelberg Catechism became part of the doctrinal standards of the Dutch Reformed churches. For centuries it has been cherished by Presbyterians as well, especially for its warm and autobiographical style, as displayed in its first question and answer:


Q. What is your only comfort in life and in death?
A. That I am not my own, but belong "“ body and soul, in life and in death "“ to my faithful savior Jesus Christ.
He has fully paid for all my sins with his precious blood, and has set me free from the tyranny of the devil. He also watches over me in such a way that not a hair can fall from my head without the will of my Father in heaven: in fact, all things must work together for my salvation.
Because I belong to him, Christ, by his Holy Spirit, assures me of eternal life and makes me wholeheartedly willing and ready from now on to serve him.



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These historical glimpses come from Mr. John Muether, Church Historian for the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. Mr. Muether is also the Librarian at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida, and an elder at the Lake Sherwood OPC in Orlando. With degrees from Gordon College and Westminster Theological Seminary, he is a frequent contributor to various academic journals and is co-author (along with D.G. Hart) of the book Fighting the Good Fight of Faith: A Brief History of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Additionally, the first-ever Reformed confession of faith was that drawn up by Zwingli known as the 67 Theses. I don't know the precise date of that document, but it was presented for consideration at a meeting Zurich on January 29, 1523.

After three years of preaching, Zwingli prepared 67 theses ("Schlussreden"), intended for a more popular audience than Luther's and covering all the points of the "Gospel," as he called it. In accordance with the religious policy of the Swiss at that time, there had to be a public debate before radical measures were taken in religious matters. A meeting was called in Zürich January 29, 1523, presided over by the mayor. All the clergy were invited. There was no real debate, only a dialogue between Zwingli and the vicar-general of Constance. The decision of the magistracy was that the doctrines Zwingli had preached should be enforced in the canton of Zürich.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huldreich_Zwingli

The First Confession of Basle, Switzerland was also promulgated on January 21, 1534.

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/creeds1.ix.ii.iii.html
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Originally posted by Irishcat922
On January 19, 1563, the Heidelberg Catechism was published in German under the title, "œCatechismus, or Christian Instruction, as Conducted in the Churches and Schools of the Electoral Palatinate."
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Additionally, the first-ever Reformed confession of faith was that drawn up by Zwingli known as the 67 Theses. I don't know the precise date of that document, but it was presented for consideration at a meeting Zurich on January 29, 1523.



Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huldreich_Zwingli

The First Confession of Basle, Switzerland was also promulgated on January 21, 1534.

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/creeds1.ix.ii.iii.html

Zwingli's 67 Theses may be found online here.
 
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