This Week in Reformed History

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Irishcat922

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This Week in Reformed History

Three hundred years ago, On October 5, 1703, Jonathan Edwards was born in East Windsor, Connecticut.

Generally regarded as America´s greatest theologian, Edwards authored several classics in Christian literature, including The Religious Affections, The Freedom of the Will, and The Nature of True Virtue. In addition he is well known for preaching what might be the most famous sermon in American history, "œSinners in the Hands of an Angry God" (see entry for July 2"“July 8). He was an ardent supporter of the Great Awakening, defending the revival both against its critics and its zealous extremists.

Pastor, theologian, missionary to Native Americans, and President of the College of New Jersey for a brief time before his death in 1758, Edwards´ legacy has generated divided assessments. For some his theological orthodoxy and spiritual zeal exemplify the best of "œexperiential Calvinism." For other interpreters, his incorporation of Enlightenment ideas inevitably led to theological deviation of his successors in the rise of "œNew England Theology."


From the O.P.C. website.

www.opc.org
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Other events this week in church history:

* October 4, 1535 -- Publication of the Coverdale Bible, first complete English Bible translation;

* October 4, 1565 -- Death of Petrus Paulus Vergerius, Italian Reformer;

* October 5, 1568 -- Publication of the Bishop's Bible;

* October 5, 1600 -- Birth of Thomas Goodwin, English Puritan;

* October 6, 1520 -- Publication of Martin Luther's The Babylonian Captivity;

* October 6, 1536 -- Martyrdom of William Tyndale, English Reformer;

* October 7, 1644 -- Publication of Samuel Rutherford's Lex Rex;

* October 8, 451 -- Opening of the Council of Chalcedon; and

* October 9, 1747 -- Death of David Brainerd, American missionary.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
From Philip Schaff, Creeds of Christendom, Vol. I, pp. 584-585:

Peter Paul VERGERIO.1117

1117See Chr. H. Sixt: Petrus Paulas Vergerius, . . . eine reformationsgeschichtliche Monographie (Braunschweig, 1855), pp. 391 sqq. and 437 sqq. Comp. also Herzog's art. Vergerius, in his Real-Encykl. Vol. XVII. pp. 65 sqq.

During the same period Poland was twice visited (1557 and 1559) by another remarkable man among the secondary reformers— Peter Paul Vergerio (1498–1565), formerly papal nuncio to Germany and Bishop of Capo d’Istria.1118

1118See Chr. H. Sixt: Petrus Paulas Vergerius, . . . eine reformationsgeschichtliche Monographie (Braunschweig, 1855), pp. 391 sqq. and 437 sqq. Comp. also Herzog's art. Vergerius, in his Real-Encykl. Vol. XVII. pp. 65 sqq.

In the attempt to refute the Lutheran writings he had become a Protestant, introduced the Reformation in the Italian parts of the Grisons (Valtellina, Poschiavo, and Bregaglia), and then took up his residence in Tübingen under the protection of Duke Christopher of Würtemberg, writing many books and making important missionary journeys. He was well received in Poland by Prince Radziwill and the king. He associated mainly with Lutherans and the Bohemian Brethren, but labored for the cause of union, like Laski.1119

1119He thought at one time of joining the Unitas Fratrum, being disgusted with the renewal of the sacramental war. Even Melanchthon once expressed a similar desire, ' in Valdensium ecclesiis me inserere et in illis mori; placent enim mihi summopere. ' See his letter to V. Dietrich, quoted by Herzog, p. 71.

He aided the Reformation by his able pen, and the Roman historian Raynaldus says that 'this wretched heretic led many weak Catholics into the camp of Satan.' But his stay in Poland was too short to leave permanent results.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
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