Thomas Chalmers, a Vegetarian?

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scottmaciver

Puritan Board Sophomore
I came across this surprising comment in a letter from Thomas Chalmers to Rabbi Duncan. Any thoughts on the following?

"...I share the horror you express at the cruelty of slaughtering animals for amusement. I think that their being even slaughtered for food is one of the greatest enigmas of our present mysterious world. The day is coming however, when, "the mystery of God will be finished" (Rev x), and this, with all other difficulties, will be solved..."

The Letters of Thomas Chalmers, P.362.
 

deleteduser99

Puritan Board Junior
Probably that, though it's lawful, it's still painfully unpleasant since it wouldn't happen without the curse; not that it's sinful.
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
Is Chalmers being consistent?

Acts 10:15 And a voice spoke to him again the second time, “What God has cleansed you must not call common.”

Granted, I agree with his position on the brutality that takes place in mass animal production-some of it may be sinful; however, I am sure that the temple sacrifices were brutal-of course, not in the same degrees. In our age, being a meat eater, I hide from certain truths. That saddens me.
 

scottmaciver

Puritan Board Sophomore
A friend of mine responded with the following:
"I’d suggest Chalmers is referring to the tension between dominion over the animals and God’s permitting us to kill and eat them. It was of course necessary for the sacrificial cult that animals be slaughtered and the offered were commanded to eat of that animal. I don’t think Chalmers is affirming vegetarianism as much as highlighting this paradox resulting from the Fall: man is both to care for his animals and eat them."
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
A friend of mine responded with the following:
"I’d suggest Chalmers is referring to the tension between dominion over the animals and God’s permitting us to kill and eat them. It was of course necessary for the sacrificial cult that animals be slaughtered and the offered were commanded to eat of that animal. I don’t think Chalmers is affirming vegetarianism as much as highlighting this paradox resulting from the Fall: man is both to care for his animals and eat them."

Yea, context is everything.
 

Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
Our forebears may not have been tree-huggers, but I recall noting several years ago how opposed they were to cruelty to animals. What first piqued my interest in the subject was some stuff I came across concerning the Belfast Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, which was largely run by the same people who ran the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society. Here are a few posts on the subject:

Thomas Houston on the Belfast Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Thomas Houston on postmillennialism and animal welfare

James Ussher on cruelty to animals

I have more in the pipeline (DV).
 

TylerRay

Puritan Board Graduate
From Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Thomas Chalmers:

"Tuesday--Studied til 2. Quarter-decked along south front of Mr. Harley's grounds. Came back to my beef-steak, and after it I had another round of visitation at the head of the Green..."
 

scottmaciver

Puritan Board Sophomore
From Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Thomas Chalmers:

"Tuesday--Studied til 2. Quarter-decked along south front of Mr. Harley's grounds. Came back to my beef-steak, and after it I had another round of visitation at the head of the Green..."

Hahaha, I guess that clears that up!
 
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