Walter Ross Taylor on Christ as the propitiation for the sins of the world

Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
But for whose sins is Christ the propitiation? “He is,” says the Apostle, “the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.” When he says, “for our sins,” he may mean, either for the sins of us — Jewish believers, or for the sins of us — believers whether Jews or Gentiles. If he means the former, then the meaning of the second clause is, and not for ours only, but also for the sins of believers of all nations.

He is the propitiation for the sins of us Jewish believers, and not for ours only, but also for the sins of believers throughout the whole world. In this view, the language would agree with that of Caiaphas, which he spoke not of himself, but, being High Priest that year, by Divine inspiration, when he prophesied that Jesus should die for that nation, and not for that nation only, but that he should gather together in one the children of God who are scattered abroad.

But it may be said, that there is no evidence that the Apostle John in his Epistle addressed Jewish believers merely. It may be said, that he addressed believers generally, and this may be true; and so his meaning here will be, — He is the propitiation for our sins, who have already taken him as such; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of any and all, who will take him, throughout the whole world. This Is the view which we would be disposed to adopt; and in this view the words correspond with those of our Lord in his intercessory prayer, — “Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on me through their word.”

For the reference, see Walter Ross Taylor on Christ as the propitiation for the sins of the world.
 
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