We have no altars (Pierre Jurieu)

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
We have no Altars; for since that Jesus Christ did Sacrifice his Sacred Person for our Salvation, having no more Sacrifices, we need no more Altars.

Pierre Jurieu, A preservative against the change of religion, or, A just and true idea of the Roman Catholick religion, opposed to the flattering portraictures made thereof, and particularly to that of my Lord of Condom, trans. Claudius Gilbert (London: Thomas Cockerill, 1683), p. 41.
 

mgkortus

Puritan Board Freshman
I trust I understand the intent of the quote (no altars like the RCC), but it is kind of odd in light of Hebrews 13:10 ("We have an altar..."). Does Jurieu acknowledge that in the context?
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
On Hebrews 13:10, yes we do have an altar, just as we have a sacrifice: Our Lord Christ.

And only that.

I haven't read Jurieu, but I'd think that would be the obvious context if he were asked about Hebrews 13.
 

Pilgrim

Puritanboard Commissioner
Neither do we have priests in the RC and Anglo-Catholic sense. There is a tendency nowadays to refer to anyone as a priest who is ordained clergy in Anglicanism. The wiki article Jurieu states that he was ordained an "Anglican priest" before returning to France. I doubt very much he would have considered himself to be a priest if he held the views then that he expresses here. I suspect this tendency to refer to them all as priests is a reflection on the influence of Anglo-Catholicism.
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
I trust I understand the intent of the quote (no altars like the RCC), but it is kind of odd in light of Hebrews 13:10 ("We have an altar..."). Does Jurieu acknowledge that in the context?

He means altars in the Romish sense. In that sense, we have no altars in our Reformed churches.
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
There is a tendency nowadays to refer to anyone as a priest who is ordained clergy in Anglicanism. The wiki article Jurieu states that he was ordained an "Anglican priest" before returning to France.

In the Reformation CofE, "priest" was used a contraction of Presbyter.
 

Pilgrim

Puritanboard Commissioner
In the CofE, "priest" was a contraction of Presbyter.
That's good to know. I doubt that's the connotation now. Haven't terms like "rector" been more common with evangelical Anglicans in recent years? Didn't Ryle denounce the idea of being a "priest?" I can't remember if it was "priest" or "Father."
 

Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
That's good to know. I doubt that's the connotation now. Haven't terms like "rector" been more common with evangelical Anglicans in recent years? Didn't Ryle denounce the idea of being a "priest?" I can't remember if it was "priest" or "Father."

In the CofI, Rector is the term most commonly used for a parish minister. Anytime an ordination has been announced, we have been told that so and so is going to be ordained as a presbyter. For political reasons if nothing else, using the term "priest" in Northern Ireland would not go down well among most Protestants.
 
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