What are the eschatological implications of Light/Day in Scripture?

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WrittenFromUtopia

Puritan Board Graduate
There seems to be a recurring pattern in Scripture of the coming of the light, and the new "day", as opposed to the night or darkness. The "day of the Lord" is said to be a dark day, or night, and a day of darkness in the prophetic literature of the OT. The coming of Christ is said to be the light coming into the world, and the calling of people out of the dark into God's marvelous light. I am thinking that this pattern has significant implications for understanding eschatology in Scripture...

Some verses to consider:

And God said, "Let there be light," and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. (Genesis 1:3-4)

For God, who said, 'Let light shine out of darkness,' has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. (2 Corinthians 4:6)

For you are all children of light, children of the day. We are not of the night or of the darkness. (1 Thessalonians 5:5)

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. (1 Peter 2:9)

This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. (1 John 1:5)

For at one time you were darkness, but now you are light in the Lord. Walk as children of light (Ephesians 5:8)

The night is far gone; the day is at hand. So then let us cast off the works of darkness and put on the armor of light. (Romans 13:12)

I have come into the world as light, so that whoever believes in me may not remain in darkness. (John 12:46)

Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, "œI am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life." (John 8:12)

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. (John 1:5)

The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shined. (Isaiah 9:2)

Who among you fears the Lord and obeys the voice of his servant? Let him who walks in darkness and has no light trust in the name of the Lord and rely on his God. (Isaiah 50:10)

Give glory to the Lord your God before he brings darkness, before your feet stumble on the twilight mountains, and while you look for light he turns it into gloom and makes it deep darkness. (Jeremiah 13:16)

For you are my lamp, O Lord, and my God lightens my darkness. (2 Samuel 22:29; cf. Psalm 18:28)

He uncovers the deeps out of darkness and brings deep darkness to light. (Job 12:22)

Light dawns in the darkness for the upright; he is gracious, merciful, and righteous. (Psalm 112:4)

Then I saw that there is more gain in wisdom than in folly, as there is more gain in light than in darkness. (Ecclesiastes 2:13)

Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter! (Isaiah 5:20)

:candle:
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Brimstone
Originally posted by WrittenFromUtopia
I am thinking that this pattern has significant implications for understanding eschatology in Scripture...

I'd be interested to know what significant implications you perceive from this pattern.
(Not that I necessarily disagree with you. I've just not really thought about it before and I'd rather not post opinions without at least some forethought. :bigsmile:
 

WrittenFromUtopia

Puritan Board Graduate
Basically, the idea of the "age" and the "age to come", how that relates to the "night" and "day" theme.. the timing of the "day of the Lord" (past - a.d. 70 - or future?), etc...
 

crhoades

Puritan Board Graduate
Been reading James Jordan or Leithart again? :lol:

Sorry, Gabe...had to. It was just sitting there. Back to intelligent, charitable, reformed discussion.

Incredible set of verses.
 

Dan....

Puritan Board Sophomore
I'll not give an opinion pro or con of the book, but just an FYI. It has been a few years since I read it, but A.W. Pink's Gleanings in Genesis goes into detail on a symbolic interpretation of the creation week. He held that the creation week is a picture of salvation. He held a gap theory and that the creation week was actually a re-creation week. He taught that just as the earth was being transformed from darkness to light, from desolation to order, so also in salvation, God transforms man from spiritual darkness to spiritual light.
 

WrittenFromUtopia

Puritan Board Graduate
Originally posted by crhoades
Been reading James Jordan or Leithart again? :lol:

Sorry, Gabe...had to. It was just sitting there. Back to intelligent, charitable, reformed discussion.

Incredible set of verses.

No, I stay away from heretics.
 

crhoades

Puritan Board Graduate
Originally posted by WrittenFromUtopia
Originally posted by crhoades
Been reading James Jordan or Leithart again? :lol:

Sorry, Gabe...had to. It was just sitting there. Back to intelligent, charitable, reformed discussion.

Incredible set of verses.

No, I stay away from heretics.

Serious face on...When interpreting scripture, what guides/controls our use of imagery and typological interpretations? We all grant that there are themes woven through the Bible such as light/darkness etc. How do we know that we can tie all of them together into a man-made theory of coherence vs. allowing the imagery to work within its context. The reason I threw the Jordan and Leithart joke in there was that they have been notorious for doing this very thing. Bahnsen used the words interpretive maximalism to paint Jordan and even Chilton's Days of Vengence. Should we not let Scripture determine the proper exegesis of typological verses and then stop? Looking for discussion regarding the use of typology and the verses above not wanting to get into FV stuff.;)

[Edited on 2-15-2006 by crhoades]
 

WrittenFromUtopia

Puritan Board Graduate
That's why I posted the thread. I'm not making any claims at all. I'm not forcing Scripture into any preconceived notion of poetry, literature, or any other systematic structure.
 

crhoades

Puritan Board Graduate
Originally posted by WrittenFromUtopia
That's why I posted the thread. I'm not making any claims at all. I'm not forcing Scripture into any preconceived notion of poetry, literature, or any other systematic structure.

Not even eschatology?;)

One more passage to add to the list especially hitting on the eschatalogical implications:

Rev.21
22And I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. 23And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and its lamp is the Lamb. 24By its light will the nations walk, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it, 25and its gates will never be shut by day--and there will be no night there. 26They will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations. 27But nothing unclean will ever enter it, nor anyone who does what is detestable or false, but only those who are written in the Lamb's book of life.

Rev. 22
5And night will be no more. They will need no light of lamp or sun, for the Lord God will be their light, and they will reign forever and ever.

Do a search on ' sun' in Revelation. Cool stuff.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Clerk
Originally posted by WrittenFromUtopia
Originally posted by crhoades
Been reading James Jordan or Leithart again? :lol:

Sorry, Gabe...had to. It was just sitting there. Back to intelligent, charitable, reformed discussion.

Incredible set of verses.

No, I stay away from heretics.

Vern Poythress uses the same method. This isn't "hippie eisogesis" is it? Remember that phrase? ;) .Don't worry, though, I think this kind of stuff is cool.
 

WrittenFromUtopia

Puritan Board Graduate
Originally posted by Draught Horse
Originally posted by WrittenFromUtopia
Originally posted by crhoades
Been reading James Jordan or Leithart again? :lol:

Sorry, Gabe...had to. It was just sitting there. Back to intelligent, charitable, reformed discussion.

Incredible set of verses.

No, I stay away from heretics.

Vern Poythress uses the same method. This isn't "hippie eisogesis" is it? Remember that phrase? ;) .Don't worry, though, I think this kind of stuff is cool.

Yeah, I remember that phrase and there's a good reason I used it. I haven't exegeted or eisogeted anything in this thread. I posted verses and asked if this was an eschatological theme. Your post is worthless. Don't get mad at me for rightly being critical of your Federal Vision and New Perspective friends. May God be gracious to you.

[Edited on 2-15-2006 by WrittenFromUtopia]
 
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