What does it mean to "forsake the assembling of ourselves together"?

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timfost

Puritan Board Senior
I'm starting to wonder if perhaps another thread should be started on this subject?
Exactly, show me where a RE teaches in scripture...PS. there are none. :)

Earl,

I'm not sure if you've even thought through what you were saying. 1 Tim. 3:2, 2 Tim. 2:2, 24 all say that an elder is to be able to teach. Are we talking about grammar and arithmetic? Of course, it is the word of God!
 

earl40

Puritan Board Professor
I'm starting to wonder if perhaps another thread should be started on this subject?


Earl,

I'm not sure if you've even thought through what you were saying. 1 Tim. 3:2, 2 Tim. 2:2, 24 all say that an elder is to be able to teach. Are we talking about grammar and arithmetic? Of course, it is the word of God!

There are threads on this already and I wish to not derail this thread anymore. I will leave with just one , or two words. "Ruling"elder..."Teaching"elder. :)
 

Eoghan

Puritan Board Senior
Should one attend all services on a Sunday? As a young Christian I found myself attending two services on a Sunday, leading a Crusader class Sunday afternoon, Youth fellowship Sunday evening, 420 Club Tuesday night, mid-week Bible study Wednesday and Christian Union at lunchtime mid-week. (Yes I am a Baptist)

I have rationalised that and feel duty bound to attend a (singular) Sunday service but all else is subservient to my conscience, family and mental healtho_O
 

Edward

Puritanboard Commissioner
The things which I have listed, as far as I can see, are prohibited by Scripture. The only permissable form of Bible Study that I can see is one lead by either the minister or elders.

Does your Bible have Titus 2 in it? Or do you contend that such lessons would not be Biblical?

The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children, To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.
 

Edward

Puritanboard Commissioner
As a young Christian I found myself attending two services on a Sunday,

Piker. A couple of weeks ago I was in 3 services on Sunday morning. Need to up that game. (I did bail before the third sermon - I have a limit of one time through for a sermon).
 

Wretched Man

Puritan Board Freshman
There are threads on this already and I wish to not derail this thread anymore. I will leave with just one , or two words. "Ruling"elder..."Teaching"elder. :)
I would be interested in seeing the other threads related to this - or seeing a new thread started. Can you provide links? I’m certainly opposed to women teaching in the church. From there, I become heavily conflicted on what is appropriate. I’ve always struggled to handle the “4 daughters of Philip prophesizing”, “Priscilla teaching Apollos”, or the “prophetess Anna”...
 

earl40

Puritan Board Professor
I would be interested in seeing the other threads related to this - or seeing a new thread started. Can you provide links? I’m certainly opposed to women teaching in the church. From there, I become heavily conflicted on what is appropriate. I’ve always struggled to handle the “4 daughters of Philip prophesizing”, “Priscilla teaching Apollos”, or the “prophetess Anna”...

Short and to the point which is irrefutable.

https://www.puritanboard.com/threads/the-office-of-ruling-elder.14841/
 

TheInquirer

Puritan Board Freshman
Going back to the OP, I have been troubled when pastors have tried to make mid-week Bible studies mandatory. In one case, the pastor didn't seem too troubled by congregants missing church on Sunday. I saw no biblical justification for this type of thinking.

When the authority of Scripture is not withheld, all kinds of man-made rules fill the vacuum. I would only be comfortable applying this passage to the Sunday gathering.

Its actually this kind of thing in the church that led me to study the Sabbath in more detail even though I have not been a part of Sabbath-keeping churches. I am no expert on this topic but I do see this command in Hebrews rooted in the Sabbath concept.
 

alexandermsmith

Puritan Board Junior
Does your Bible have Titus 2 in it? Or do you contend that such lessons would not be Biblical?

The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children, To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.

I have already addressed this passage in this discussion.
 

Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
Not to continue to 'derail the post', I believe this is an important facet that should be addressed.

Scripture tells parents- fathers and mothers- to nurture their children in the faith and for children to heed the teachings of their parents. That's completely different and not relevant to what I've been saying.

6 And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: 7 And thou shalt teach (8150) them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.

The Holy Bible: King James Version, Electronic Edition of the 1900 Authorized Version. (Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 2009), Dt 6:5–7.

8150. שָׁנַן shanan (1041d); a prim. root; to whet, sharpen:—pierced(1), sharp(4), sharpen(2), sharpened(1), teach them diligently(1).

Robert L. Thomas, New American Standard Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek Dictionaries : Updated Edition (Anaheim: Foundation Publications, Inc., 1998).

It would seem as if scripture makes a subtle distinction between an official (T)eaching and the (t)eaching that parents and (for example), 'the older women'. *This becomes somewhat of a sticky whicket in most circles as it seems to be used in an illicit fashion, becomes a confusing term, melded together wrongly.

As to your friends and coworkers: are you holding a bible study in your work? If so and I were your elder I'd tell you to stop. If you want to evangelise your coworkers and give them the reason for the hope which is within you I would say: go for it, we have Scriptural precept for that.

The above is as well a confused term; whether or not one see 'evangelization' as an active office (some do), the bible uses it is the context of an office. Hence, to use the term like it is used above, with its history in the scripture, is to use it erroneously, in my opinion. Better to clarify how one is using it and why so as to not cause more confusion on the confusing subject. Semantics?
 

alexandermsmith

Puritan Board Junior
No, you haven't. You interacted with a small portion out of context.

If my memory serves me correctly this isn't the first time you have come into a discussion late and demanded I repeat myself just for you, and I'm sure it won't be the last, but anyway here is my answer. Here I addressed the exact portion you quoted in your post. If you don't agree with my interpretation then offer your own. If you are unable to offer your own then remain silent. But this tactic of accusing me of not addressing the issue is nothing more than that: it is a tactic to divert and distract. By saying I have not addressed this portion of Scripture, rather than saying you disagree with my interpretation, is to suggest I have been unable to offer an interpretation of it, or to discount what I have said as irrelevant. It is a sneaky tool of debate.

I don't see that Paul's command for women to be silent in the church is restricted to the worship service. They are not to teach and they are not to usurp authority. 1 Corinthians 14:34, 35: " Let your women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted unto them to speak; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law. And if they will learn any thing, let them ask their husbands at home: for it is a shame for women to speak in the church."

The idea that Paul meant this only for the worship service but would have been happy with women teaching the church in other contexts has no basis in Scripture and is clearly in opposition to all he says on this matter. As regards the older women teaching the younger women, what is it, exactly, that the aged women are to teach the younger women? Titus 2:4: "That they [the aged women] may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children." Not doctrine, not theology, not holding Bible studies exegeting Scripture but how to be chaste women, good wives and mothers. This does not require women's bible studies lead by women reading sentimental claptrap spewed out by the publishing houses as an easy money maker. The idea that a church would allow women to go off on their own and start teaching each other doctrine is absurd and this has been amply illsutrated by the reality of women's bible studies and conferences.

As for teaching authority, Paul is quite clear: 1 Timothy 2:12: "But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence." Who is given authority to teach in the church? 1 Timothy 3:1: "If a man desire the office of a bishop..." It is men who are to rule and teach in the church.
 
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alexandermsmith

Puritan Board Junior
Not to continue to 'derail the post', I believe this is an important facet that should be addressed.



6 And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: 7 And thou shalt teach (8150) them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.

The Holy Bible: King James Version, Electronic Edition of the 1900 Authorized Version. (Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 2009), Dt 6:5–7.

8150. שָׁנַן shanan (1041d); a prim. root; to whet, sharpen:—pierced(1), sharp(4), sharpen(2), sharpened(1), teach them diligently(1).

Robert L. Thomas, New American Standard Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek Dictionaries : Updated Edition (Anaheim: Foundation Publications, Inc., 1998).

It would seem as if scripture makes a subtle distinction between an official (T)eaching and the (t)eaching that parents and (for example), 'the older women'. *This becomes somewhat of a sticky whicket in most circles as it seems to be used in an illicit fashion, becomes a confusing term, melded together wrongly.

Thank you for this. It is a very important distinction which, as you suggest, is at the root of the confusion in this area. As if to prohibit women from teaching in the church is to quite literally silence them at all times so as to not even be able to offer private counsel or their own opinion on theological matters.

The above is as well a confused term; whether or not one see 'evangelization' as an active office (some do), the bible uses it is the context of an office. Hence, to use the term like it is used above, with its history in the scripture, is to use it erroneously, in my opinion. Better to clarify how one is using it and why so as to not cause more confusion on the confusing subject. Semantics?

I was using evangelise in the informal sense. I recognise, of course, that there is in the church the formal position of Evangelist (or Home Missionary as was often the case over here in Scotland and a recognised position still used in my own denomination). If you think my use of the term evangelise causes too much confusion I'm happy to another word or term you think more appropriate. What I was trying to get at was that all Christians are commanded to be able to explain the hope they have withen them when asked/challenged. And all Christians are at liberty to distribute Christian literature (preferably produced by trustworthy sources) and all Christians are at liberty to engage in theological discussions (though it may not always be wise to do so). I would place a formal Bible study- which by its nature touches upon elements of authority and teaching which I believe to be regulated by Scripture- in a separate category.
 
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Scott Bushey

Puritanboard Commissioner
that all Christians are commanded to be able to explain the hope they have withen them when asked/challenged.

They are. Agreed. Sadly, this is on the foot-heels of an error (as it relates
to the previously mentioned distinction).

I would place a formal Bible study- which by its nature touches upon elements of authority and teaching which I believe to be regulated by Scripture- in a separate category.

I guess this would boil down to definitions. Many would only attach the word, 'Formal' to those studies that are specifically sent, of the local church. In other words, if one wasn't actually sent by their local church, should they never pursue having any biblical studies with people who are seeking truth and are not members of any local church body? 'Giving witness to the hope that is in us', would be (t)eaching; one would be hard pressed to simply make the statement, 'the hope that is within us', without actually (t)eaching what that means, no? After all, we are speaking of people that have no idea what this statement means. It may be completely new to them.

 

Edward

Puritanboard Commissioner
If my memory serves me correctly this isn't the first time you have come into a discussion late and demanded I repeat myself just for you, and I'm sure it won't be the last, but anyway here is my answer. Here I addressed the exact portion you quoted in your post.

A:
Titus 2:4: "That they [the aged women] may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children." Not doctrine, not theology, not holding Bible studies exegeting Scripture but how to be chaste women, good wives and mothers.

B:
The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things; That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children, To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.

A =/= B

Now, if you can point me to a post up thread where you discussed how blasphemy has nothing to do with the Bible, I'll revise my argument.
 

SolaScriptura

Puritanboard Brimstone
Hebrews is very Christocentric, but the aim of the book is to encourage Christians to persevere, specifically to encourage them not to *renounce* their faith in Jesus and go back to a former faith/life.

Within that context the word the author uses in 10:25 means to “leave behind”, “desert” or “abandon” or to “separate connection with someone.” In other words, don’t leave the church!

I recoil whenever I see this passage used to imply that someone is violating it if they don’t come to every activity or service or gathering at a church.
 
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