When Is U2 Going To Put Out A New Album?

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crixus

Puritan Board Freshman
It's been over three years since U2 announced that they would release a new album called Songs of Ascent, but it's still not out yet. Does anyone know when the release date is? U2 is one of my favorite bands, but they sure do take their sweet time when it comes to releasing studio albums. Their last release of new material was back in July 2009 with the No Line On The Horizon album. At the time they stated that they had enough material for another album but would hold on to it for later release. And that was over three years ago....
 
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Peairtach

Puritan Board Doctor
U2's been around for ages and have released a lot of good albums.

You can't blame them for taking it easy, resting on their laurels and enjoying their dosh.
 

crixus

Puritan Board Freshman
I can honestly say that this is the first time in my life that I've ever heard of dosh. But by your response I take it's a good thing. :banana:
 

Peairtach

Puritan Board Doctor
"British and Australian slang for money. 20th century. Origin unknown."

"Many American dictionaries certainly don't know where it comes from. Come to think of it, the OED doesn't know, either. What is known is that _dosh_ is first recorded in 1914 with the meaning "a bivvy; a temporary shelter or tent". Prior to that it was doss, as in _doss-house_. It is thought that that word derives ultimately from _dorsum_ "back", presumably because one would sleep on one's back (on the ground) in a temporary shelter.
_Dosh_ "money" dates from about 1944. Some etymologists think it may come from _doss_ "bivvy", the notion of _dosh_ being one of "money to pay for room and board (a place to "bivvy" or sleep)", while others think it is a conflation of _dollars_ and _cash_. This latter would suggest an American origin, perhaps plausible given the word's appearance in around 1944, but it is unlikely as it is unknown in the U.S.
As neither of these explanations is satisfactory, we would like to propose another. It is possible that this is a modern version of _dash_ meaning a "tip" or "gratuity". _Dash_ is believed to derive from _dashee_, a West African word that first appeared in print in 1788. A commentator on the African slave trade noted that _dashes_ were made to "the Kings of Bonny". We presume that the kingdom of "Bonny" was the extensive African civilization which we now refer to as Benin.
From Take Our Word For It (August 21, 2000)"
 
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