Why do Reformers like the King James version rather than go back to the Geneva Bible?

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Ajf777

Puritan Board Freshman
To the best of my recollection,the pilgrims did reject the KJV and it was the Geneva Bible that was brought over on the Mayflower.

Remember also,the Anglican church was very Calvinistic in those days and I think the vast majority of the KJV translators were thorough-going Calvinists.God-bless!
 

AlexanderHenderson1647

Puritan Board Freshman
I've seen some contrary scholarship, but for what it is worth, William Barker (professor of History of Westminster Seminary Philadephia, USA) offers this in his volume "Puritan Profiles,"

"When James VI of Scotland became James I of England after the death of Queen Elizabeth I in 1603, he was greeted on his way south by English Puritans bearing the Millenary Petition, purportedly conveying the desires of one thousand ministers to be relieved from certain rituals of the Church of England that they regarded as not supported by Scripture. King James therefore called the Hampton Court conference of 1604, where the Puritans were represented by such learned and moderate leaders as John Reynold and Lawrence Chaderton. It was here that King James said, "Presbytery agreeth as well with monarchy as God with the devil," and "No bishop, no King." Out of this conference did come, however, agreement to produce a new translation of the Bible. Six groups were established - two at Oxford, two at Cambridge, and two at Westminster - to work independently on different parts of the Scriptures. The 50-some scholars were instructed to use the "Bishops' Bible" of 1568 as a basis, but to consult all earlier English versions, including the Catholic Douai version and the Geneva Bible favored by the Puritans. The result was the Authorized Version of 1611, commonly known as the "King James Bible." Despite its general acceptance and acknowledged beautiful cadences, many Puritans still preferred the Geneva Bible, particularly for its Calvinistic marginal notes."

I hope this helps, Jackie.
 
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