William Cunningham on the need for a first cause of all things

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Reformed Covenanter

Puritanboard Commissioner
The question is this, Can men, by the exercise of their natural faculties upon themselves, and upon other objects around them, ascertain and prove the existence of an intelligent First Cause of all things; and if so, what is the amount of the information which in this way may be acquired concerning him?

Now, it has been shewn in innumerable works, and by unanswerable arguments, that men, in the fair exercise of their faculties, looking within upon themselves, and without upon the world around them, are reasonably and necessarily led to believe that there exists an invisible intelligent Being, to whom they themselves, and all other objects of their contemplation, owe their existence; that this great Being must rule and govern everything according to the counsel of his own will; that he is possessed of the highest moral excellence, and ought therefore to be worshipped and obeyed. ...

For more, see William Cunningham on the need for a first cause of all things.
 
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