William White on adherence to the covenants in the Church of Scotland post-Revolution

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Reformed Covenanter

Cancelled Commissioner
At the Revolution, all the faithful ministers were earnest for the formal recognition of the Covenants. This however was delayed, the time not being suitable. The General Assembly, however, in its acts 1690, 1700, 1701, mention breach of covenant as a cause of fasting. (Wodrow’s Correspondence, vol. i. pp. 124, 125.) Even so late as 1726, after a debate with some brethren that were for putting in the covenants more plainly, they were agreed to be included under the more courtly phraseology of solemn engagements to God. (Wodrow, vol. iii. p. 256.) Till after the secession all the eminent evangelical ministers continued to maintain the permanent obligation of the covenants.

It was not until Moderatism had destroyed the spiritual understanding of the church, that there ceased to be men who gave warning to the nation of the sin of covenant-breaking. About 1727, that spurious spirituality which has since done so much injury, made its appearance in Mr [John] Glass and his adherents. Among other things they denied the obligation of our covenants. Various ministers of the Establishment distinguished themselves in defending what till then were the common principles of the better party in the church. One of these subscribes himself, “a well-wisher of the Covenanted Reformation;” another subscribes himself, “a lover of peace and truth,” – both published in 1727, and both maintain the warrantableness and continued obligation of national covenants.

For the reference, see William White on adherence to the covenants in the Church of Scotland post-Revolution.
 
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