Would Logos work for me with my computer stuck in guest mode?

JeffR

Puritan Board Freshman
A couple days ago my computer without warning when i opened it up required a password, i never set it up that way, so of course i didn't know what this mystery password is, so i am stuck in Guest Mode, which bars me from using apps and all that sort of thing. My question is would this hinder my attempt to download the Logos software? I feel it would, but i am super intrigued by the possibilities of Logos, it would take my reading to the next level. I would perhaps need a ipad to use it without a cumbersome laptop right?

Things i would be most excited with Logos would be:

1. Increased amount of Reformed literature, including Barth's Church Dogmatics
and 2. how EVERYTHING you've gotten there would sync up.
 
If you're locked out of your computer because you forgot the password, and you have no way of getting or resetting the password, you should reset the computer. That may involve reinstalling the operating system (which also has the benefit of clearing out any viruses and malware).
If there's anything on the computer you need like photos or documents then you'll want to back up the hard drive first.
 
If you're locked out of your computer because you forgot the password, and you have no way of getting or resetting the password, you should reset the computer. That may involve reinstalling the operating system (which also has the benefit of clearing out any viruses and malware).
If there's anything on the computer you need like photos or documents then you'll want to back up the hard drive first.
Very helpful, thanks.
 
Now i know what i'd have to do, but i'm in no rush, for the following reasons:

1st - My google document, which the working title is My Work, is called that because i feel it is my duty to work at compiling all my resources in written form, so as to know better what there is and where to locate them, all the menial labor that Logos would do for me.

2nd - reading various sources at a time without them all being focused on a certain thing like a verse enables me to touch on many points of interest.

3rd - even if i do use Logos, i need to develop a savings strategy to get things on it, i'd want the most souped up Reformed package there is, which can cost as much as a fancy car or a house even!! and this combines well with the needed time to read what i already am blessed with.

4th - Logos would make me wish i had started using it once it was ever available, because my time is running up, the rest of my earthly life in regards to reading material is full as it is, my cup overfloweth, i only wish new resources become available before i die, like Polanus etc.

5th - Logos is best for Pastors and scholars, i am neither, i must therefore not overreach as a overzealous lay-person.
 
Ipad is nice to have with logos for casual reading, but pales in comparison to the pc/Mac versions when you’re doing research or a more in-depth study. I had a friend who got a fancy iPad to use for logos and was disappointed when he found out that it can’t do everything the computer version can.
 
In the short term, there is a decent version of Logos you can use from your web browser.
 
In the short term, there is a decent version of Logos you can use from your web browser.
At the bare minimum i can browse and see what i can get on Amazon, thanks, just made a Logos account, (baby steps).
 
I wrote to my Pastor regarding my concerns about using books gotten through Z-Library, he might provide the guidance i require, and regarding Logos here i think the extent of my use of it is to find Reformed resources i wasn't aware of to find on Amazon or other legal manners. Thanks everyone here in getting me to take more seriously how and what i use for my personal studies, it's like i'm setting up for myself my own seminary, which is also designed a little on a deep reading approach from Benjamin McEvoy, the Hardcore Literature Bookclub guy, before coming here i was under his sway with classic literature, but the Lord was calling me to be more focused on the Faith, and Reformed literature being the highest of all uninspired sources.
 
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