Covenanters and Cromwell

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sastark

Puritan Board Graduate
Originally posted by VirginiaHuguenot
To reiterate: I recommend reading The Story of the Scottish Church by Thomas M'Crie, Chap. X. It covers the history of Cromwell vs. the Covenanters and shows how Cromwell tried to usurp authority over the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland and how he broke the Covenants. It is a sad story.

Haven't read this chapter yet, but I did just find this book online at: http://www.pap.com.au/mccrie2/tm_ssc00.htm
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Clerk
Allan, I need to study Hebrew tonight but would gladly get back to this question. If you do a search you will note that Andrew and I have probably given over a hundred posts relating to this topic. Until then, try the search but I will keep you in mind.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
On the subject of lawful resistance to tyrants, I would also recommend reading the short section (30-32) of Chap. 20, Book IV in Calvin's Institutes.
 

BayouHuguenot

Puritanboard Clerk
Greg Bahnsen actually gives a more balanced account of resistance to tyranny led by the lesser civil magistrate in By This Standard. He is actually more restraining than I would be on this subject. This should silence any libel that "theonomists just want to overthrow the government" (sorry, old threads die hard). That being said, in God and Politics: Four Views he does lay several pre-conditions for resistance to tyranny led by the lesser civil magistrate.
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
Robert Blair (Scottish Presbyterian, said to have drafted the Directory for Family Worship) on Oliver Cromwell:

His [Robert Blair's] opinion of Cromwell, on the contrary, was not very high. Of late the custom has been to laud the Protector, and to speak of him as a sort of demi-god"”the uncrowned king of England. But men of good judgment, who lived in his own time, and knew him, personally, did not speak of him in such flattering terms. Blair had met him at Marston-Moor; and afterwards when he came to Edinburgh, he and David Dickson and James Guthrie were sent to him on some ecclesiastical business. Cromwell made to them a fair flourish of words, shed tears on the occasion, and frequently appealed to God to witness his sincerity. When they came out, Dickson said, "I am very glad to hear this man speak as he does." "Do you believe him?" said Blair. "If you knew him as well as I do, you would not believe one word he says. He is an egregious dissembler, and a great liar. Away with him! He is a greeting devil."

Source: Thomas Witherow, Historical and Literary Memorials of Presbyterianism in Ireland
 
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