How do believers deal with anti-Christian movements?

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
Hello brothers and sisters in Christ,

As most of you are aware in recent years Christianity has been under constant scrutinty from far-left groups such as BLM, LGBT, and other socialist reformation like movements.

A group of protestors gathered in front of the State Library of Victoria here in Melbourne and started screaming out hate against the government, the police (who were peacefully watching this protest unfold), black injustice, and feminsts who are transphobic. I took this photo a few minutes ago. The 'A' in the red flag is I think the symbol for atheism.

It reminded me of the sermon the pastor at my church preached last Sunday. While they are disappointed and hateful to the people about which they are against (Truth abiding believers included), they are ultimately disappointed with God. In this sense, grudging against any circumstance we face is ultimately grudging against God's divine sovereignty.

I have seen much on the side of conservative evangelicals pointing out the evils of this movement (I do this too), but is there actually much we can do to help people trapped in these Satanic movements? Do we just watch and pray? Or should we be actively putting ourselves at risk and preaching the truth to plant a seed? Alternatively, do we acknowledge that they are making a conscious decision to rebel against God and let God judge?

When I was sitting near listening to some of the things they were saying, I felt first a need to pray for their salvation, second an urge to be the next microphone bearer and preach against their celebration of sin, and third to move on and let God's wrath and justice unfold.

In your opinion what is the most loving thing to do as a believer when confronted with such street protests?

Screenshot_2021-03-31-14-14-02-35.jpg
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
Minor point, but I believe the circled “A” is the symbol for anarchism.
I just searched it up and it looks like you're right. Either way, the truth is that Satan is behind such movements. It may as well be 'A' for antichrist too as John expresses in his first letter. Thanks for pointing that out!
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
Study the book of Revelation and pray for boldness.
I think that those are two good ideas.
Will I do this to teach them about the end times and pray for boldness in order to share that message? Or just for personal security? Since my question more referred to lovingly and actively helping people out of the movement could you please elaborate a bit more. Thanks!
 

Romans830

Puritan Board Freshman
Study to know the times and why that's happening. But also pray for laborers with the same burden you have. Maybe the Lord will raise up a group of you to go out and share the gospel with those lost souls.
 

VictorBravo

Administrator
Staff member
I had to look up "TERF": Trans-exclusionary-radical-feminist. I guess they are the next target for cancelling.

I hadn't been following, but there are strange allies and enemies everywhere. Maybe I'm overly optimistic, but 20 years ago I quipped that postmodernism would be a long-term benefit: first it destroys modernism; then it destroys itself.

Ugly how it's doing it, though.
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
but there are strange allies and enemies everywhere.
Indeed. They team up with other groups who in their view are marginalised and oppressed.

On a side note, I was enrolled in a social work degree two years ago with the optimism of becoming a counsellor. The first lecture was filled with false expectations and irrational ideas. For example, the lead lecturer (who also is knighthooded for his philanthropy), is optimistic that one day all people will receive the same wage regardless of their ability, skills etc. It is basically communism which runs these groups.

In addition, the second teacher in that lecture made an analogy something to this effect: 'getting the government to support the marginalised is just as likely as Jesus walking on water.' A student (presumably a Christian) courageously interjected but the teacher insisted that they were pointing out the uniqueness of this miracle rather than (what they suggested) the impossibility of it.

I wasn't having any of that so I dropped out a few days later. I'm convinced that most of the people enrolled in the course will be brainwashed into thinking they are the only righteous people in the world and that, linking this to your point on postmodernism, there is no objective standard of truth and moreover that only their own morals matter. This creates a wave of cognitive dissonance likened to those involved in cults.

It creates thoughts like:
Christians oppressed black slaves, therefore all Christians are racist.' or if one were to ask if Adolf Hitler was a good person they would respond 'well it depends'...

Granted that a lot of the people who are involved in these movements would already be bombarded with false perceptions about reality, morality and truth, perhaps would it be wise to let God judge and not intervene?
 

Romans830

Puritan Board Freshman
Indeed. They team up with other groups who in their view are marginalised and oppressed.

On a side note, I was enrolled in a social work degree two years ago with the optimism of becoming a counsellor. The first lecture was filled with false expectations and irrational ideas. For example, the lead lecturer (who also is knighthooded for his philanthropy), is optimistic that one day all people will receive the same wage regardless of their ability, skills etc. It is basically communism which runs these groups.

In addition, the second teacher in that lecture made an analogy something to this effect: 'getting the government to support the marginalised is just as likely as Jesus walking on water.' A student (presumably a Christian) courageously interjected but the teacher insisted that they were pointing out the uniqueness of this miracle rather than (what they suggested) the impossibility of it.

I wasn't having any of that so I dropped out a few days later. I'm convinced that most of the people enrolled in the course will be brainwashed into thinking they are the only righteous people in the world and that, linking this to your point on postmodernism, there is no objective standard of truth and moreover that only their own morals matter. This creates a wave of cognitive dissonance likened to those involved in cults.

It creates thoughts like:
Christians oppressed black slaves, therefore all Christians are racist.' or if one were to ask if Adolf Hitler was a good person they would respond 'well it depends'...

Granted that a lot of the people who are involved in these movements would already be bombarded with false perceptions about reality, morality and truth, perhaps would it be wise to let God judge and not intervene?
I went to a public and secular university so I understand. I spoke up when I got the chance but it's very disheartening. Full-blown atheism, teachers mocking and misrepresenting scripture and the list goes on. I say speak up when you can but pray for those opportunities.
 

dhh712

Puritan Board Freshman
Granted that a lot of the people who are involved in these movements would already be bombarded with false perceptions about reality, morality and truth, perhaps would it be wise to let God judge and not intervene?
My own impression is this right now, and I am open to constructive biblical advice on the matter: Much of these people have their hearts hardened by God (he has not softened their hearts to hear the truth). Any direct preaching or biblical wisdom to them would bounce off as though tossed against a brick wall. I am thinking of the verse where Jesus says do not cast your pearls before swine; the majority of these people would not know what to do with such things except to cover it in their own filth. I don't recall exactly also if there is biblical foundation in instructing those whose hearts have been softened by God (maybe in Proverbs?).

Right now I feel that lest we encounter those who are seeking the truth (whom God has given the mercy to seek him), all we really can do is continue to preach the full counsel of God against such blatant Satanic attacks, stand firm in our beliefs and do not compromise with the enemy and pray--that God will slay the enemy either in Christ or outright, whichever is his will.
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
Any direct preaching or biblical wisdom to them would bounce off as though tossed against a brick wall
I agree. I can picture the backlash. But I also think that despite their initial hostility, direct preaching might plant a seed that will sprout at a later time: if God wills, in his timing.
the majority of these people would not know what to do with such things except to cover it in their own filth.
Again, I agree. But would you think it'll be worth it if a very small minority hear the gospel and positively respond to their calling unto salvation?
stand firm in our beliefs and do not compromise with the enemy
Thanks for this advice. I think the issue of protecting our minds and keeping it in the word is perhaps more important for believers now than at any other time, save the period of early church persecution. So many distractions today and doubtless more false gospels and cults (existing and emerging) worldwide than any time throughout history. I wholeheartedly agree with this approach: even seemingly minor compromise of the gospel like not preaching God's wrath against the wicked has shown to have a devastating chain effect on society. A little more leniency to the unrepentant each year and imagine the scope of biblical liberalism in a century.
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
I went to a public and secular university so I understand. I spoke up when I got the chance but it's very disheartening. Full-blown atheism, teachers mocking and misrepresenting scripture and the list goes on. I say speak up when you can but pray for those opportunities.
This just reminded me of my second attempt at uni.

Right after I left that social work course, I was joyful that God permitted me enrolment into Trinity College Theological School to study a Bachelor of Theology. The first lecture on OT had a required reading which contained this exact quote: 'women, not men, are suffering servants and Christ figures.' This was under the feminism part of the course.

In addition, our required bible for the course was either the NRSV Oxford Annotated Edition or the NRSV HarperCollins. I got the HarperCollins and was devastated to read some of the commentaries. The one on Exodus was disheartening. The scholar said something to the effect that although the book of Exodus may serve as a myth, the story plays a pivotal role on the biblical storyline. There were many more liberal teachings (hypercritical of the bible text) that were a blatant attack on inerrancy.

I was very disheartened like you and left a week or two later after the first few lessons.

But I thank God that he led me to the puritans.
 

Taylor

Puritan Board Senior
Right after I left that social work course, I was joyful that God permitted me enrolment into Trinity College Theological School to study a Bachelor of Theology. The first lecture on OT had a required reading which contained this exact quote: 'women, not men, are suffering servants and Christ figures.' This was under the feminism part of the course.

In addition, our required bible for the course was either the NRSV Oxford Annotated Edition or the NRSV HarperCollins. I got the HarperCollins and was devastated to read some of the commentaries. The one on Exodus was disheartening. The scholar said something to the effect that although the book of Exodus may serve as a myth, the story plays a pivotal role on the biblical storyline. There were many more liberal teachings (hypercritical of the bible text) that were a blatant attack on inerrancy.
The truth is that this stuff—schools of unbelief posing as centers for biblical and theological education—is far more dangerous than any of the stuff you see in the picture in the original post.
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
The truth is that this stuff—schools of unbelief posing as centers for biblical and theological education—is far more dangerous than any of the stuff you see in the picture in the original post.
I can see the devastating impacts false bible colleges would have on the church.
But can you please elaborate on what you mean by 'dangerous'? Thank you.
 

Jack K

Puritan Board Professor
The first and most important thing to do is to be an excellent and caring neighbor. Make friends with people on your street and in your workplace, and love them well. Demonstrate good character and concern for others, not selfish indulgence. "Keep your conduct among the Gentiles honorable, so that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day of visitation" (1 Peter 2:12).
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
"Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed, saying, Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us. He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision. Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure." (Psalms 2:1-5)
 

sgemmen9

Puritan Board Freshman
Modeling is an important component. I personally stay away from protests and rallies. Chances are those who are there are already prepared for a fight. I prefer to influence those in my congregation and neighborhood through conversations. I also try to pray frequently. I feel a sense of stress from these movements. It's worth naming our helplessness and praying that God would change the hearts of those involved. The more reactive we are the more we feed the fire.
 

hLuke

Puritan Board Freshman
The first and most important thing to do is to be an excellent and caring neighbor. Make friends with people on your street and in your workplace, and love them well. Demonstrate good character and concern for others, not selfish indulgence. "Keep your conduct among the Gentiles honorable, so that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day of visitation" (1 Peter 2:12).
Thanks so much for this wise counsel, Jack. God's providence showed up this morning in my reading of "The Glory of Christ" by John Owen. The content contained therein is fitting to place beside this wonderful word of wisdom from you.

"The first union is a natural union. God has made all mankind 'of one blood' (Acts 17.26). So every man is every other man's brother or neighbour to whom care, love and kindness must be shown (Luke 10.36). This union also exists between Christ and his church (Heb 2.14-15). So 'he who sanctifies and those who are being sanctified are all one' (Heb 2.11). His infinite willingness to humble himself in coming into this communion and union of nature with us we have clearly seen. But this union is quite different from that of all other men who have the same nature.
The union between Christ and his church did not arise by necessity of nature, but from a voluntary act of his will. All other unions are necessary. Every man is every man's brother whether he likes it or not, because the union is by natural generation. But this was not so with Christ. He came into this natural union with us of his own free choice, because the children were already partakers of flesh and blood. He would be what the children were. So the union of Christ in human nature with the church is gloriously different from that union which is amongst others in the same nature. And therefore, although it may not be considered right among mere men that one should suffer for others, because of their union with each is forced upon them and not by their free choice, yet with the Lord Christ it is quite different. The union he has with the church was by his own free choice."

(Owen, John) The Glory of Christ: The Glory of Christ's union with the Church, The Banner of Truth Trust, R.J.K Law, 1994, Edinburgh, UK.
 

Edward

Puritanboard Commissioner
but there are strange allies and enemies everywhere.
I remember one of my better undergrad courses - Interest Group Politics. Decades ago, the prof was telling us that the traditional political groups would die out, replaced by ever changing groups coming together on specific issues even where the coalition members differed strongly on other issues.

I also learned a lot in the other course that I took from him - Politics of Violence. It might be more useful in dealing with the question at the top of the thread.
 
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