John 1:14 CEB

Sovereign Grace

Puritan Board Freshman
A friend of mine has sent me at different times two CEB's. One is smaller and the last one a massive sized study bible. They include the apocrypha in both of them, so I like that, as I didn't have that. The first one I stowed away and barely read it. The study bible I took to church this last sunday. My pastor read John 1:14 in his KJV and when I read it in the CEB, I was floored.

The Word became flesh
and made his home among us.
We have seen his glory,
glory like that of a father’s only son,
full of grace and truth.


This is just awful. It takes away from Christ's deity. Needless to say, I won't be taking this bible to church and the only time I will use it is to read the apocrypha or use it as a reference.
 

Jake

Puritan Board Senior
The Apocrypha is valuable to have (for example, the Maccabees are helpful when studying Daniel), but you can find them in much better translations. I recommend the RSV or ESV, but you can also find KJV if you prefer.
 

greenbaggins

Administrator
Staff member
A friend of mine has sent me at different times two CEB's. One is smaller and the last one a massive sized study bible. They include the apocrypha in both of them, so I like that, as I didn't have that. The first one I stowed away and barely read it. The study bible I took to church this last sunday. My pastor read John 1:14 in his KJV and when I read it in the CEB, I was floored.

The Word became flesh
and made his home among us.
We have seen his glory,
glory like that of a father’s only son,
full of grace and truth.


This is just awful. It takes away from Christ's deity. Needless to say, I won't be taking this bible to church and the only time I will use it is to read the apocrypha or use it as a reference.
While I do not agree with this translation, there is at least a scholarly discussion about the meaning of monogenes, with many reputable scholars going with something like the CEB meaning. There are other much worse problems with the CEB than this. The translation of Genesis 1:1, for example, implies pre-existent matter. And yes, although there is also a scholarly discussion about that, the consensus conservative viewpoint is that bereshit is in absolute state, not construct, thus eliminating the temporal interpretation (E.J. Young proved that the absolute state underlying the traditional translation is far more likely). I was actually surprised that the CEB in Romans 9:5 does not imply that the Christ and God are two different persons. But in Isaiah 7:14, the CEB translation of almah is "young woman." While this is within the semantic range of the word, it doesn't fit the context best, and by "context" here I include Matthew quotation of it, which is certainly not a misquotation.
 
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