Berean Study Bible available in print

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Georgiadis

Puritan Board Freshman
I’ve posted about this translation before but it is now (finally) available in print.


I use BibleHub a lot and their BSB translation has really grown on me. I think they’ve struck the best balance between word-for-word and thought-for-thought.

Their team is smaller than others but I think the benefits that come from not being backed by a large publishing company has allowed them to produce a faithful modern translation without pressure to conform to current trends. I’m talking about you adelphoi!

I ordered a copy and am looking forward to making it my primary reader for awhile.
 

Taylor

Puritan Board Graduate
This does look like an interesting work. It seems to have some good scholarship behind it, too. That is the case for at least the advisory committee (which includes men like Grant Osborne). As far as I am able to find, the actual translation committee has remained nameless. I have spent some time last night and this morning checking it out, which I normally do by going through a short list of "spot check" passages, and it seems to be a good translation.

EDIT: After looking at the advisory committee members, while it still looks good, a couple of the members are...odd. I am still unclear who Ulrik Sandborg-Petersen is. His website does not indicate whether or not he is even Protestant. And Baruch Korman seems to be a so-called "Messanic Jew." He has a website called "Love Israel," by which he propagates his literal Millennialism. Furthermore, and even more disturbingly, his statement of faith includes this statement on God:

We believe in one G-d, the G-d of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, for He is the Creator of the heavens and the earth. We believe there is great significance in the verse from Deuteronomy 6:4, "Hear O Israel, the L-rd our G-d, the L-rd is One."​
The Hebrew word for "One", in this verse, implies a composite One. The text does not use the Hebrew word which means "an absolute One." The significance of this choice of words shows that G-d consists of G-d the Father, G-d the Son, and G-d the Holy Spirit. Hence, we believe in the Trinity and that each member of the Trinity is eternal and absolute G-d.​

Aside from the really annoying superstition of spelling "God" as "G-d," his statement of God's oneness here as "composite One" is very least confusing, at very worst full-blown heresy.

Fortunately, this committee only takes on an advisory role. And the fact that Grant Osborne and Eugene Merrill are on there gives me some relief. And, the statement of faith of Bible Hub, the publisher behind this project, is sound, albeit short.
 
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Georgiadis

Puritan Board Freshman
short list of "spot check" passages
Curious what some of your spot check passages are. I always lookup my fav verses but that doesn’t necessarily shed light on anything scholarly. I’m usually just checking to make sure they didn’t ruin my memory verses haha!
 

Taylor

Puritan Board Graduate
The more I use this resource, the more I like it. Here is one thing in particular I noticed this weekend. This translation's textual footnotes are, in my opinion, quite good. Not only do they clue the reader in on variants, but they are actually quite specific as to which editions contain the variants. They are so specific, that they will tell you whether or not the variant occurs in the TR (Textus Receptus), BYZ (Byzantine/Majority Text text form), SBL (Society of Biblical Literature NT), and ECM (Editio Critica Maior), and even the GOC (Greek Orthodox Church's NT), plus several more. This is a level of specificity that even the NKJV's excellent notes do not provide.

Also, the larger and more disputed textual variants (i.e., the longer ending of Mark and the Pericope Adulterae) this translation does not bracket or set apart visually in any way. All they have is a kind-of-difficult-to-see footnote noting, with the above specificity, the variance in those places. Unlike other major versions, there are no obnoxious double brackets around the text and all-caps headings within the text screaming at you, "THE OLDEST AND BEST MANUSCRIPTS OMIT THIS PASSAGE." I really like that about this translation. This may prove to be a very valuable resource.
 
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Georgiadis

Puritan Board Freshman
This translation's textual footnotes are, in my opinion, quite good.
I agree. I thought it was strange that this translation was called a “study Bible” until I saw how they used the footnotes and section headings. I’ve gotten so used to study bibles acting more like commentaries that the BSB’s simple yet straight-forward approach kind of threw me at first. Now I love it!
 
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