Lifetime reading goal

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JeffR

Puritan Board Freshman
This can be a discussion, let us all know what some of your reading goals are if you have any, or why reading goals are bad news. I just want to share what could be my last immature post here, i tried a couple times to post this on reddit but their mods are lightning fast deleting anything that doesn't have that certain something you could spend a whole day trying to figure out what it is. My plan is simple, ergo profound, and is designed to prompt me to spend less time online, unless i'm getting down with Ligonier. So, starting now, i want to see if i can read as many books as will match the number of the year i die, so if i die in 2040, to have read 2,040 books, now this might seem insane or silly, but listen, a lot of them will be quick reads, around the 100 page mark, while surely others will be hefty tomes and even multi-volumed works.

A projected tabulation -- 1,500 Reformed books // 200 Patristic books // 200 other kinds of Christian books // the rest classic literature

I'll be hunkering down now, maybe if wanted i could share what is accomplished per 100, in spectacular semi detailed annotated lists!! I'm such a clown, i must pinch myself many a time, and say to myself am i really on PURITAN BOARD??!! They haven't kicked me out yet??!!
 
I'd be interested to hear people's strategies for reading goals.

It's not something I've personally done before because 1. I'm often very busy (mainly with work/studying for professional qualification), and 2. I'm a slow reader (depending on the book). I have a few wishful thoughts, like to read all of the great books series. But the only real "goal" I actively have is to read and meditate with prayer over the Bible daily.

For any large goal to be manageable and achievable it has to be broken down into smaller and smaller steps. Do you have a strategy?
 
This can be a discussion, let us all know what some of your reading goals are if you have any, or why reading goals are bad news. I just want to share what could be my last immature post here, i tried a couple times to post this on reddit but their mods are lightning fast deleting anything that doesn't have that certain something you could spend a whole day trying to figure out what it is. My plan is simple, ergo profound, and is designed to prompt me to spend less time online, unless i'm getting down with Ligonier. So, starting now, i want to see if i can read as many books as will match the number of the year i die, so if i die in 2040, to have read 2,040 books, now this might seem insane or silly, but listen, a lot of them will be quick reads, around the 100 page mark, while surely others will be hefty tomes and even multi-volumed works.

A projected tabulation -- 1,500 Reformed books // 200 Patristic books // 200 other kinds of Christian books // the rest classic literature

I'll be hunkering down now, maybe if wanted i could share what is accomplished per 100, in spectacular semi detailed annotated lists!! I'm such a clown, i must pinch myself many a time, and say to myself am i really on PURITAN BOARD??!! They haven't kicked me out yet??!!
God is not concerned with how many books you read. You will have an eternity to read all the "new editions" ratified of the mistakes made in finite understanding. Plus you will have an eternity to read all of the books created in eternity. What God is more concerned about, is what draws you closer to him, and what keeps you within the confines of biblical orthodoxy. Men care about the number, like we care about what degree hangs on our wall, what professors we sat under, what professions we have, what type of beef we eat, what type of clothes we wear, or what type of car we drive. God is looking for a pure, honest, and enduring faith. If this means reading the same book 10 times, so be it. Plus, keep in mind, there will always be more that you havent read, then that which you have. I am under the impression, that a person could only own the Puritan Paperback series, a Bible, a concordance, and a good Commentary set; and they may live a life of more devout and profitable holiness then people with seminary size personal libraries. Do not get into the rut of letting your mind confine you to this reality. If you are a true child of God, you are an eternal being. This means, in actuality, you will not only have a year or two for reading every single book written about Jesus; but after those 20 million years, it would be but a day in the length of your life.

My best advice to you, is snap out of your bibliophilia that plagues so much of the more intellectual Christendom, stop collecting, stop saying what you are going to do, and start enjoying what you have. Just read my brother, and give us a report of what you have read. It is not a race. You may have a plan, but read a book by a certain author, then want to read everything that author wrote. You may read a book on a subject, and become infatuated on the subject. Let your plan be your rough outline; and then, pick up a book and enjoy the journey. Remember, the saddest thing is not beginning a journey you never finish, but spending your life preparing for a journey you never start. This is why God often times just tells people to go. A part of faith is believing he will provide for us as we follow.
 
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I'd be interested to hear people's strategies for reading goals.

At my age and health, I work mostly on shorter-term projects that I have a realistic hope of completing.

I haven't done as well as I had hoped, but the last ten years have been the best. My Logos library now has roughly 9,000 resources, most of which I will never read in detail. But from 2015 to 2020, I had the strongest sense that the volumes I picked were hand-picked by the Spirit just for me. I read primarily commentaries, which I always read cover to cover. I was very jealous of the project and allowed few diversions from my "program."

I now set small, shorter-term goals. One larger project is still underway. I fell in love with the Preaching the Word series of commentaries. I've completed about 15 (of 40) commentaries. Here's a blurb on the series:

Noted for its steadfast commitment to biblical authority, its readability, and its clear exposition of Scripture, the Preaching the Word Series is an ideal resource for pastors, teachers, and those seeking to enrich their personal Bible study. This set of commentaries on the Old and New Testaments is edited by the renowned pastor R. Kent Hughes of College Church in Wheaton, Illinois. In this collection, experienced pastors exemplify expository preaching and provide practical applications of 45 books of the Bible, as well as the Sermon on the Mount. Preachers and laity alike will find these commentaries both insightful and accessible.

It's easy. When I finish a volume, I pick another in the series.
 
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I'd be interested to hear people's strategies for reading goals.

It's not something I've personally done before because 1. I'm often very busy (mainly with work/studying for professional qualification), and 2. I'm a slow reader (depending on the book). I have a few wishful thoughts, like to read all of the great books series. But the only real "goal" I actively have is to read and meditate with prayer over the Bible daily.

For any large goal to be manageable and achievable it has to be broken down into smaller and smaller steps. Do you have a strategy?

The Bible is my only goal as well. Theologically, I have read through Calvin's Institutes, Vos and Turretin and am now annotating Beeke (at this rate it will take me to the ripe age of 150). But every day, I read the Bible and a few pages of Spurgeon/the Puritans. My specialized theology (like Colquohan's Law and Gospel etc) I have read and refer to as needed (sadly, more than I prefer but that is bound to happen in a denomination with mixed CTs among elders and pastors).
 
I'd be interested to hear people's strategies for reading goals.

It's not something I've personally done before because 1. I'm often very busy (mainly with work/studying for professional qualification), and 2. I'm a slow reader (depending on the book). I have a few wishful thoughts, like to read all of the great books series. But the only real "goal" I actively have is to read and meditate with prayer over the Bible daily.

For any large goal to be manageable and achievable it has to be broken down into smaller and smaller steps. Do you have a strategy?
My strategy is just to read most of the time, i know it's not a race, and i'm not really concerned about meeting this goal, it's just a little fun game to get me to read more because i tend to be distracted and leave things unfinished. But 50 per month was my initial thing.

God is not concerned with how many books you read. You will have an eternity to read all the "new editions" ratified of the mistakes made in finite understanding. Plus you will have an eternity to read all of the books created in eternity. What God is more concerned about, is what draws you closer to him, and what keeps you within the confines of biblical orthodoxy. Men care about the number, like we care about what degree hangs on our wall, what professors we sat under, what professions we have, what type of beef we eat, what type of clothes we wear, or what type of car we drive. God is looking for a pure, honest, and enduring faith. If this means reading the same book 10 times, so be it. Plus, keep in mind, there will always be more that you havent read, then that which you have. I am under the impression, that a person could only own the Puritan Paperback series, a Bible, a concordance, and a good Commentary set; and they may live a life of more devout and profitable holiness then people with seminary size personal libraries. Do not get into the rut of letting your mind confine you to this reality. If you are a true child of God, you are an eternal being. This means, in actuality, you will not only have a year or two for reading every single book written about Jesus; but after those 20 million years, it would be but a day in the length of your life.

My best advice to you, is snap out of your bibliophilia that plagues so much of the more intellectual Christendom, stop collecting, stop saying what you are going to do, and start enjoying what you have. Just read my brother, and give us a report of what you have read. It is not a race. You may have a plan, but read a book by a certain author, then want to read everything that author wrote. You may read a book on a subject, and become infatuated on the subject. Let your plan be your rough outline; and then, pick up a book and enjoy the journey. Remember, the saddest thing is not beginning a journey you never finish, but spending your life preparing for a journey you never start. This is why God often times just tells people to go. A part of faith is believing he will provide for us as we follow.
Just do it, in other words, thanks for your snap out of it words!
 
I have never really tried to calculate goals in this way-- my only reading goals right now generally consist of the following:
-40 books per year outside of seminary
- Creating a list of "great" works that I want to ensure I read repeatedly.

I have never really tried to calculate goals in this way-- my only reading goals right now generally consist of the following:
-40 books per year outside of seminary
- Creating a list of "great" works that I want to ensure I read repeatedly.
One that I forgot-- I also strive to read at least one large systematic or historical theological work per year.
 
Ultimately for me this is another "keep it to yourself" matter. To be clear though for me there has to be a mixture of approaches. About 75% of what i hope to read is already on my kindle. It will in many cases prove wise to re-read certain books. And after all is said and done, my fun game idea approach will fail, but if only it gets me to read better, it will have been not a wasted idea.

Thanks everyone, reading approaches from other people always instruct me, and hope others didn't see this as self serving of me.
 
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