JeffR's book acquisitions

JeffR

Puritan Board Freshman
If it is alright, i would like to have a space to share online my new book purchases, now most of what i get is ebooks, saves space, easier to read from in all sorts of ways, and so on. I used to be a part of other online communities where i'd do this, but since joining PB, i've re-dedicated myself to better books, and like i always do, i mark the occasion by being a not so good steward of my finances.

1st thing i got was The Church, the Scriptures, and the Sacraments, Volume 28 -- 4th out of 39 in the Crossway Owen, i won't be getting the Index, also Overcoming Sin and Temptation: Three Classic Works by John Owen -- because ... it's Owen, and it's got some goodies thrown in.

Then i was thinking of the registering here procedure, and want to understand this Federal Vision thing better so i got 2 volumes of Douglas Wilson, and this Federal Vision: Heresy at the Root -- the latter being i take it the Orthodox Reformed viewpoint.

And from browsing here i got hip to this Jonathan Edwards: A Life -- it's intriguing that there is a lot more Edwards than i have, which is the easily gotten things.

Economical upgrade here The Complete Biblical Commentary Collection of John Calvin -- my old edition didn't have the Prefaces.

This completes my NIVAC collection, it's a real fun series!! Ezra-Nehemiah (The NIV Application Commentary)

Whilst listening to a Beeke lecture snapped this up Worldly Saints: The Puritans As They Really Were, along with Isaac Ambrose's Looking Unto Jesus, and the good folks at Monergism came through for F.W. Krummacher's The Suffering Savior.

I desire to understand the Westminster Standards better with this promising tome The Theology of the Westminster Standards: Historical Context and Theological Insights

And for interest's sake God's Strange Work: William Miller and the End of the World along with Evidence from Scripture and History of the Second Coming of Christ

I drew the line with Henrietta Mears however, another day perhaps for the Mother of Modern American Evangelism. ... Thanks for reading, wish me well with my books, those mentioned here and all my others, good times are in store, and pray that i get a hold of my problematic spending. Thank you, and God bless.

Well i got these after getting back from church, that should do it for now, stay tuned for more rank bookish materialism!!

Church History, Volume One: From Christ to the Pre-Reformation: The Rise and Growth of the Church in Its Cultural, Intellectual, and Political Context
Church History, Volume Two: From Pre-Reformation to the Present Day: The Rise and Growth of the Church in Its Cultural, Intellectual, and Political Context

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
 
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Went on another spending spree because i found too many interesting things that i had to get, so here's what i got:

Nick Needham's 2,000 Years -- 5 volumes -- this looks like a fantastic church history!! I really hope Nick finishes it, 2 more volumes left, right??

I want some heretical resources, and not just Ireneus The Text of Marcion's Gospel and The Pelagian Controversy: An Introduction to the Enemies of Grace and the Conspiracy of Lost Souls

Tonight i went down the Plymouth Brethren rabbit hole, and went wild at that site which offers a bunch for free plus some accounts of people escaping from the Exclusive Brethren, and there's some great documentaries from the 70's to 90's on it that give me powerful nostalgic vibes. With these guys The Collected Works of WTP Wolston - Sixteen books in one // The Mackintosh Treasury: Miscellaneous Writings

The previous initial rabbit hole was Dispensationalism with these The Gospel of the Kingdom // The Late Great Planet Earth

This is probably not gonna be sound doctrinally but could be enjoyable Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

And a Marrow starter pack -- The Marrow of Modern Divinty // From the Marrow Men to the Moderates: Scottish Theology 1700–1800 // The Marrow Controversy and Seceder Tradition: Atonement, Saving Faith, and the Gospel Offer in Scotland (1718–1799)

And let me tell you i have my eye on the Foundations of Evangelical Theology series.


Yeah so i might have to keep the computer off for awhile and just read on my kindle for a few dozen years now!!
 
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Quite the endeavour/feast/challenge. I keep realising it takes much less time to purchase or download a book than it does to read one!

In case you're not already aware, there are fantastic ebook sales by Crossway (each January) and RHB (last year was in June) on their respective websites, as well as Challies Kindle deals which I check every day or so for any on the wishlist.

You mentioned the NIVAC series, do you have any favourites in there?

I'm (still) reading Fesko on the theology of the Westminster Standards. It's a serious book but very helpful to see the actual spectrum of views of the reformers and Puritans who influenced the Confession.
 
Quite the endeavour/feast/challenge. I keep realising it takes much less time to purchase or download a book than it does to read one!

In case you're not already aware, there are fantastic ebook sales by Crossway (each January) and RHB (last year was in June) on their respective websites, as well as Challies Kindle deals which I check every day or so for any on the wishlist.

You mentioned the NIVAC series, do you have any favourites in there?

I'm (still) reading Fesko on the theology of the Westminster Standards. It's a serious book but very helpful to see the actual spectrum of views of the reformers and Puritans who influenced the Confession.
Hi Alex, yes it is, thanks, i've only scratched the surface of NIVAC, but the Job commentary made an impact, for introducing me to the term theodicy. It may not be the best commentary series, but it's engaging. Good to hear about Fesko, he's a name i can trust, just like Carl Trueman. I may add that i have Sproul's Truths We Confess which may be a more easy primer on the WCF.
 
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This is an non-updated list of the Christian authors in my Christian library, to bring you all up to speed, some of the Patristic sources aren't named here, all of the recent purchases would add many names here, plus an exhaustive account of my Christian library would have to include in a couple appendixes 1) Collections, for example the Feasting on the Word series, etc, and 2) sources that are close to Christianity that are more known for being secular, people like Dante, and Montaigne even more so. Plus an account of which Bible editions are there, and all those commentaries, you know i had the crazy idea about a year ago that i'd collect all the best commentaries on each book, it was at a time when NICOT and similar titles were at a reduced price, for example 12 dollars when now they're 60 to 80 dollars (there's an interesting book about Debt btw, i put it on my shopping list, it has the novel idea that debt began before there was even currencies) well anyway, i am slowly working on a better list of my resources, naming each work from each author, and with appendixes for for example Special Studies which would have such compartments of mainstream popular Christianity as The Charismatic Movement, and perhaps some things conservatives would see as being separate from the faith, in this list i don't aim to be saying what is and what isn't Christian, but that which has been seen as falling under that banner for whatever reason. As i slowly prepare the better list it is during this time of getting back to it on a heart level, you know how Owen, Sibbes, Flavel, Goodwin, Perkins and all those Puritans are effecting me, as i read them i'm treated to a view of what is wrong with me, it's becoming clearer as the days go by that this is serious, that there's a lot of work to be done, and it could never be done with human strength.

Clement of Rome (35 - 99)
Polycarp (69 - 155)
Justin Martyr (100 - 165)
Irenaeus (130 - 202)
Clement of Alexandria (150 - 215)
Tertullian (160 - 220)
Origen (185 - 253)
Cyprian (210 - 258) —-
Eusebius (260-265 - 339)
Athanasius (296-298 - 397)
Cyril of Jerusalem (313 - 386)
Gregory Nazianzen (329 - 390)
Saint Basil (330 - 379)
Gregory of Nyssa (335 - 395)
Saint Ambrose (339 - 397)
Jerome (342 - 420)
John Chrysostom (347 - 407)
Augustine (354 - 430)
John Cassian (360 - 435) —--
Cyril of Alexandria (376 - 444)
Benedict of Nursia (480 - 548)
John Climacus (579 - 649)
John of Damascus (675-676 - 749?)
Anselm (1033 - 1109)
Bernard of Clarveuax (1090 - 1153)
St Francis of Assisi (1181 - 1226) —-
Saint Bonaventure (1221 - 1274) —
Thomas Aquinas (1225 - 1274)
Meister Eckhart (1260 - 1328)
Thomas a Kempis (1380 - 1471)
Martin Luther (1483 - 1546)
William Tyndale (1494 - 1536)
Menno Simons (1496 - 1561)
Philip Melanchton (1497 - 1560)
Heinrich Bullinger (1504 - 1575)
John Calvin (1509 - 1564)
John Knox (1514 - 1572)
St Teresa of Avila (1515 - 1582)
Theodore Beza (1519 - 1605)
St John of the Cross (1542 - 1591)
Franciscus Junius (1545 - 1602)
William Perkins (1558 - 1602)
Jacobus Arminius (1560 - 1609)
Amandus Polanus (1561 - 1610)
Francis de Sales (1567 - 1622)
William Ames (1576 - 1633)
Richard Sibbes (1577 - 1635)
Thomas Hooker (1586 - 1647)
Thomas Goodwin (1600 - 1680)
Jeremiah Burroughs (1600 - 1646)
Samuel Rutherford (1600 - 1661)
John Trapp (1601 - 1669)
Mary of Agreda (1602 - 1665)
Thomas Shepard (1605 - 1649)
William Spurstowe (1605 - 1666)
Thomas Brooks (1608 - 1680)
Jeremy Taylor (1613 - 1667)
Richard Baxter (1615 - 1691)
John Owen (1616 - 1683)
William Gurnall (1616 - 1679)
Thomas Manton (1620 - 1677)
Thomas Watson (1620 - 1686)
Edward Polhill (1622 - 1694)
Francis Turretin (1623 - 1687)
Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)
Matthew Poole (1624 - 1679)
William Bates (1625 - 1699)
John Flavel (1627 - 1691)
George Swinnock (1627 - 1673)
Stephen Charnock (1628 - 1680)
John Bunyan (1628 - 1688)
Walter Marshall (1628 - 1680)
Petrus van Mastricht (1630 - 1706)
John Howe (1630 - 1705)
Matthew Mead (1630 - 1699)
Joseph Alleine (1634 - 1688)
Ezekiel Hopkins (1634 - 1690)
Thomas Vincent (1634 - 1678)
Wilhelmus a Brakel (1635 - 1711)
Herman Witsius (1636 - 1708)
Robert Traill (1642 - 1716)
Madame Guyon (1648 - 1717)
Henry Scougal (1650 - 1678)
Francois Fenelon (1651 - 1715)
Benedict Pictet (1655 - 1724)
Matthew Henry (1662 - 1714)
Thomas Boston (1676 - 1732)
William Law (1686 - 1761)
Anne Dutton (1692 - 1765)
Alphonsus Liguori (1696 - 1787)
John Gill (1697 - 1771)
Jonathan Edwards (1703 - 1758)
John Wesley (1703 - 1791)
Theodorus Van Der Groe (1705 - 1784)
Alban Butler (1710 - 1773)
George Whitefield (1714 - 1770)
John Woolman (1720 - 1772)
John Brown (1722 - 1787)
John William Fletcher (1729 - 1785)
Charles Simeon (1759 - 1836)
Adam Clarke (1762 - 1832)
Peter Cartwright (1785 - 1872)
Charles Finney (1792 - 1875)
Charles Bridges (1794 - 1869)
Jean-Henri Merle d”Aubigne (1794 - 1872)
Charles Hodge (1797 - 1878)
John Henry Newman (1801 - 1890)
Johann Peter Lange (1802 - 1884)
William Cunningham (1805 - 1861)
James Bannerman (1807 - 1868)
Phoebe Palmer (1807 - 1874)
James Aitken Wylie (1808 - 1890)
Octavius Winslow (1808 - 1878)
Horatius Bonar (1808 - 1889)
Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)
J.C. Ryle (1816 - 1900)
Charles Ellicott (1819 - 1905)
Philip Schaff (1819 - 1893)
R.L Dabney (1820 - 1898)
W.G.T. Shedd (1820 - 1894)
A.A. Hodge (1823 - 1886)
Andrew Murray (1828 - 1917)
Hannah Whitall Smith (1832 - 1911)
Charles Spurgeon (1834 - 1892)
Augustus Hopkins Strong (1836 - 1921)
Abraham Kuyper (1837 - 1920)
D.L. Moody (1837 - 1899)
J.R. Miller (1840 - 1912)
A.B. Simpson (1843 - 1919)
Maria Woodworth-Etter (1844 - 1924)
BB Warfield (1851 - 1921)
Herman Bavinck (1854 - 1921)
R.A. Torrey (1856 - 1928)
Reuben A. Robinson (1860 - 1942)
Samuel Logan Brengle (1860 - 1936)
Geerhardus Vos (1862 - 1949)
G Campbell Morgan (1863 - 1945)
John G. Lake (1870 - 1935)
Robert Hugh Benson (1871 - 1914)
Frank Bartleman (1871 - 1936)
Louis Berkhof (1873 - 1957)
G.K. Chesterton (1874 - 1936)
F.B. Meyer (1874 - 1929)
Oswald Chambers (1874 - 1917)
J. Gresham Machen (1881 - 1937)
A.W. Pink (1886 - 1952)
Paul Tillich (1886 - 1965)
Klaas Schilder (1890 - 1952)
Aimee Semple McPhersen (1890 - 1944)
Cornelius Van Til (1895 - 1987)
Fulton Sheen (1895 - 1979)
A.W. Tozer (1897 - 1963)
C.S. Lewis (1898 - 1963)
John Murray (1898 - 1975)
Martyn Lloyd -Jones (1899 - 1981)
J Vernon McGee (1904 - 1988)
Hannah Hurnard (1905 - 1990)
Simone Weil (1909 - 1943)
William Branham (1909 - 1965)
Francis Schaeffer (1912 - 1984)
R.J. Rushdoony (1916 - 2001)
Warren Wiersbe (1929 - 2019)
Robert L Reymond (1932 - 2013)
R.C. Sproul (1939 - 2017)
John Frame (1939 - )
John MacArthur (1939 - )
John Piper (1946 - )
Robert Lethem (1947 - )
Wayne Grudem (1948 - )
Richard A. Muller (1948 - )
Greg Bahnsen (1948 - 1995)
Joel R Beeke (1952 - )
Michael Horton (1964 - )
Carl Trueman (1967 - )
 
If you didnt know; a website called Monergism has about 1,100 or so Puritan & Reformed eBooks you can download free of charge. More are added all the time.
https://www.monergism.com/1000-free-ebooks-listed-alphabetically-author

Also, check out Puritan Publications for very reasonably priced Puritan eBooks. I think they usually range from $5-$7 and sometimes there are packaged sales.

You can add all these books to Kindle using "Send to Kindle" feature.

If you do not mind "imperfect" books, might want to check out https://sites.google.com/view/project-puritas/home . There is a library of around 7,000 eBooks in various conditions, updated from the EEBO-TCP project for better readability. Here is a link to a chart that has been created to show the non-spelling error percents, and what type of non-spelling errors are present in each text (the Puritan ones at least.) If you download the Excel sheet, you can easily convert the chart to show the least percent of errors to the greatest.
Again, there is an ePub option, so they can easily be uploaded to Kindle using "Send to Kindle."
 
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If you didnt know; a website called Monergism has about 1,100 or so Puritan & Reformed eBooks you can download free of charge. More are added all the time.
https://www.monergism.com/1000-free-ebooks-listed-alphabetically-author

Also, check out Puritan Publications for very reasonably priced Puritan eBooks. I think they usually range from $5-$7 and sometimes there are packaged sales.

You can add all these books to Kindle using "Send to Kindle" feature.

If you do not mind "imperfect" books, might want to check out https://sites.google.com/view/project-puritas/home . There is a library of around 7,000 eBooks in various conditions, updated from the EEBO-TCP project for better readability. Here is a link to a chart that has been created to show the non-spelling error percents, and what type of non-spelling errors are present in each text (the Puritan ones at least.) If you download the Excel sheet, you can easily convert the chart to show the least percent of errors to the greatest.
Again, there is an ePub option, so they can easily be uploaded to Kindle using "Send to Kindle."
Yes, i've resorted to that often, i think i've pretty much added all i didn't already have from Monergism, am so grateful to them, it's good to check whether a book can be gotten for free before paying.
 
I perhaps like too much to think out loud in typing, but i just want to put here that i shouldn't be getting much more for awhile, and this thread can safely be retired soon, i think i understand that, so that moderators don't have too much to moderate. There is so much more i want to learn about and enjoy, but as my collection sits now, i'd be busy if i even outlived Melchizedek. There has to be a being grounded in the word going on, i have as can be seen above added a lot of fluff, special interest sorts of things, like heresies and avenues i merely wish to learn about, but with Puritans they of all uninspired writers tower over the rest, like Packer's Redwood allusion, i can't get over at this juncture of time how by reading them i begin to see inside, where were it not for Grace, oh i don't know, it's new to me, to see the inward portion and see how short it comes, all the faults, the mistakes, everything magnified, a stage, leading to growth, to something where i'd be strengthened in the inner man, to do what is called for. Owen is becoming my favorite btw, he is such a wise soul surgeon, and to compare with the likes of Goodwin, Sibbes and Flavel and so on, to see the distinct flavors of each, singing in unison, the beautiful harmony of biblical sense, and wisdom. All the problems in the immediate environment besides the inner mess, and expanding out to community, and at large, but it feels like i will always be having my hands full so to speak with the inner and immediate, so much that needs the light, and expertise, the heavenly guidance, and so on, i tried here to wax eloquent, won't give up my day job, which is reading, i even think of reading when reading as something that i might have to surrender, that i like my kindle too much, to give up what is blocking you from true freedom. And then i shake my head, not ready yet for decisions like that, i must see this period as a calm before the storm, i couldn't handle a storm right now, and it's like you don't have to because He will be there for you, but in the little nooks and crannies where unmortified sin lays the spiritual life is handicapped, i'm so used to it, that i feel like i love it, i live to read, and isn't that sad, and pathetic? Nothing else is there Jeff? But then i daydream of say how Stephen Charnock loved his library so much and preferred to be alone and study and chose his intimates selectively. There are always details to matters you can never grasp all of at once, only the extraordinarily gifted can. Enough now, my parting thought here is that i shall taste the good things as much as i can, like a Piper hedonistic thing, until that time comes when the learning that accumulates will be needed.
 
I perhaps like too much to think out loud in typing, but i just want to put here that i shouldn't be getting much more for awhile, and this thread can safely be retired soon, i think i understand that, so that moderators don't have too much to moderate. There is so much more i want to learn about and enjoy, but as my collection sits now, i'd be busy if i even outlived Melchizedek. There has to be a being grounded in the word going on, i have as can be seen above added a lot of fluff, special interest sorts of things, like heresies and avenues i merely wish to learn about, but with Puritans they of all uninspired writers tower over the rest, like Packer's Redwood allusion, i can't get over at this juncture of time how by reading them i begin to see inside, where were it not for Grace, oh i don't know, it's new to me, to see the inward portion and see how short it comes, all the faults, the mistakes, everything magnified, a stage, leading to growth, to something where i'd be strengthened in the inner man, to do what is called for. Owen is becoming my favorite btw, he is such a wise soul surgeon, and to compare with the likes of Goodwin, Sibbes and Flavel and so on, to see the distinct flavors of each, singing in unison, the beautiful harmony of biblical sense, and wisdom. All the problems in the immediate environment besides the inner mess, and expanding out to community, and at large, but it feels like i will always be having my hands full so to speak with the inner and immediate, so much that needs the light, and expertise, the heavenly guidance, and so on, i tried here to wax eloquent, won't give up my day job, which is reading, i even think of reading when reading as something that i might have to surrender, that i like my kindle too much, to give up what is blocking you from true freedom. And then i shake my head, not ready yet for decisions like that, i must see this period as a calm before the storm, i couldn't handle a storm right now, and it's like you don't have to because He will be there for you, but in the little nooks and crannies where unmortified sin lays the spiritual life is handicapped, i'm so used to it, that i feel like i love it, i live to read, and isn't that sad, and pathetic? Nothing else is there Jeff? But then i daydream of say how Stephen Charnock loved his library so much and preferred to be alone and study and chose his intimates selectively. There are always details to matters you can never grasp all of at once, only the extraordinarily gifted can. Enough now, my parting thought here is that i shall taste the good things as much as i can, like a Piper hedonistic thing, until that time comes when the learning that accumulates will be needed.
I mistook Melchizedek for Methuselah, tried to edit, but i took too long i guess. Coming clean is always better anyways than trying to make it look like you never made a mistake.

I'm eagerly awaiting the arrival of Kenneth Gentry's Revelation commentary, finally available for pre-order: https://www.kennethgentry.com/the-divorce-of-israel-2-vols-by-gentry-pre-publication-offer/
Hmmmm, looks even better than Grant R. Osborne's commentary!! Thanks for letting us know, will keep it in mind for any future purchases, and may you be blessed when it arrives.
 
So when are the book reviews coming?
Thanks Jim for nudging me in this direction, in my new blog, my 2nd entry will be a review of Vitringa's The Spiritual Life, only 259 pages, so it shouldn't be too long to go through and compose my review of it, simultaneously. This will become standard practice, for marathon books like Calvin's Institutes and even longer works they will just be in draft mode for longer. Thank you again, and i looked at your blog site and shall find much nourishment there.
 
Was browsing RHB, and found a Dutch Further Reformation volume i haven't gotten yet!! But i got it from Amazon because i can share highlights with more ease that way The Practice of True Faith, Hope, and Love and this, which looks like the only other from the Classics of Reformed Spirituality series available A Spiritual Appeal to Christ’s Bride (Classics of Reformed Spirituality), hope there's more in the future, they don't all have to be complete works sets. Looking more into it --- Essential Truths in the Heart of a Christian and In Remembrance of Him: Profiting from the Lord’s Supper

These names therefore are now in my long line of resources!

Guilelmus Saldenus
Wilhelmus Schortinghuis
Jodocus Van Lodenstein
Godefridus Udemans
 
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I didn't have KU before deciding to have it when i saw there was some Kenneth Gentry books available, looks very good, and will be eventually getting his Divorce of Israel work, sometime. Much to chew on, plus i have to mention that i looked around and found a pdf of a whole lot of Jehovah's Witness material, cults are interesting aren't they, and i'd just like to see firsthand how they handle Scripture, it's like that Jesus Is Savior website i found because someone posted about it here, what a riot that stuff is!! I watched the beginning of a couple videos from there, and it's like they're always making wisecracks about Baptists, in a sneeringly smug way.
 
You all may have received an email from RHB about William Whitaker's A Disputation on Holy Scripture, i went to get the 2.99 ebook of it and i'm too broke, but it will be gotten soon, but i must also reflect on how i can joy in God's Word with the resources at hand, spending more and more time with the top 3 study bibles.
 
You all may have received an email from RHB about William Whitaker's A Disputation on Holy Scripture, i went to get the 2.99 ebook of it and i'm too broke, but it will be gotten soon, but i must also reflect on how i can joy in God's Word with the resources at hand, spending more and more time with the top 3 study bibles.
Where in the world do you see it for 2.99 on RHB?
 
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