Reading the Bible in 2022

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bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
OK, gang. Since the last week of the year starts tomorrow (12/26), it's time to ask that question again.

What are your plans for reading the Scriptures next year? I always get interesting answers to this question.
 

C. M. Sheffield

Puritan Board Graduate
I use Robert Murray M‘Cheyne’s Bible Reading Calendar. I have used it profitably for years and plan to begin again on January 1st.
 

moral necessity

Puritan Board Junior
2 Chapters OT (Morning) + 1 Chapter NT (Evening) - (Monday - Friday)
2 Chapters OT (Morning) + 3 Psalms (Evening) - (Saturday)
2 Chapters OT (Morning) + 1 Proverb (Evening) - (Sunday)

Result - Whole Bible read once, Psalms once, Proverbs 1.5 times

Blessings!
 

therussellhome

Puritan Board Freshman
I'm using a chapter-a-day (mostly) plan from OliveTree (called Every Word In The Bible) for my personal time with God. It's a multi year plan that I should be finishing this year. I'm also doing the same plan (but just recently started and doing multiple chapters a day) with my family. My kids asked to do multiple chapters a day to finish before my oldest goes to college.
 

Morgan

Puritan Board Freshman
I set my reading plan in the Olive Tree app for 4 times through. That does get adjusted though, depending on how much I'm preaching and teaching - I may substitute what was on the daily reading plan for what I'm studying at the time.

FYI I like to read it through chronologically too with OT and NT reading every day.
 
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greenbaggins

Administrator
Staff member
I've tried plans that do a chapter here and a chapter there, and found that it still atomized the text. One could profitably read an entire book here and an entire book there, but I have become convinced that if we are going to become conscious of the entire canon, then we need to read canonically. This is why I recommend (for Christians!) reading straight through the Bible, 4 chapters a day, starting in Genesis, and ending in Revelation. That is if one wants to read through the Bible in a year. If that is not the goal (and it surely does not have to be), then shorter passages that are studied more deeply would also be helpful for people to do.
 

alexanderjames

Puritan Board Freshman
I have failed to keep to a Bible reading plan. I find that in certain seasons I read more and in others less. Sometimes more quickly and sometimes more slowly. If anything, recently I have found myself reading slower and slower yet usually more deeply and meditatively, and this has afforded a blessing.

I do think plans have their place and we ought to be zealous to keep up reading of the word, but there is a danger for some who are overly scrupulous to condemn themselves for not sticking exactly to a plan.
 

therussellhome

Puritan Board Freshman
@greenbaggins - agreed. The plan I'm using is not perfect but does a decent job of keeping books intact. I enjoy the time that reading a single chapter gives me to digest and study, building the whole story day by day. For myself, I have been unable to discipline myself to read multiple chapters without skimming.
 

KMK

Administrator
Staff member
M'Cheyne

His plan was fashioned with a greater purpose than simply reading through the Bible in a year. OT and NT books are deftly placed side by side with the goal of one shedding light on the other. For example, this month we are reading through Zechariah and Revelation at the same time. I also appreciate reading the Psalms and the NT twice per year.
 

py3ak

Unshaven and anonymous
Staff member
I like the simplicity of reading 4 chapters most days, in canonical order. But I have found it's nice to break things up a bit and put a Gospel in for contrast:
Pentateuch: Matthew
Historical Books: Mark
Poetical Books: John
Prophetic Books: Luke, Acts, and the rest of the NT
 

JimmyH

Puritan Board Senior
Lord willing I will begin my 8th consecutive year of the M'Cheyne plan on Saturday next.
 

Jonathco

Puritan Board Freshman
I'll be reading through the M‘Cheyne plan for the 3rd year in a row with my church. I am also hoping to do an in-depth study of Romans in 2022.
 

Claudiu

Puritan Board Junior
I like the simplicity of reading 4 chapters most days, in canonical order. But I have found it's nice to break things up a bit and put a Gospel in for contrast:
Pentateuch: Matthew
Historical Books: Mark
Poetical Books: John
Prophetic Books: Luke, Acts, and the rest of the NT
I do a modified version of Grant Horners plan that looks like this.

My breakdown for sections is:
  1. Pentateuch
  2. History
  3. Poetry
  4. Prophets
  5. Gospels and Acts
  6. Epistles including Rev.
Last year I focused on the Pentateuch, this year history and Psalms, next year I would like to spend a decent amount in the prophets. By focus I mean that I read them through more than once, or I would reference study materials while doing my reading.

My plan is not so much a plan but a system of reading from different sections of scripture. I don't have a strict amount I read, but attempt to maintain a minimum of at last one from one section and the Psalms daily. Some days I work through a lot of chapters, while others I manage only one or two. I could never stay on track with a plan, so I like this system because I still get through the bible in a year and sometimes more, but my pace is adaptable to my schedule. I also enjoy that I can take a pause in other sections and read just one section for a few days.
 
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bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
As for me, for 2021 I read 6 chapters per day, 3 chapters in each Testament. That method took me through the entire Old Testament in 10 months and 1 week, and it took me through the New Testament 4 times. Instead of waiting until the turn of the year to begin the Old Testament again, I just started again the next day after I finished it. Today (12/26), for example, I'm in Numbers 31-33 and Luke 1-3 (probably my favorite Gospel, by the way).

Also, if I came to the end of a book where, at 3 chapters per day, I found that there would be one chapter left hanging (the last chapter of the book), I just added it to that day's reading - so, 7 chapters that day instead of 6.

I plan to continue this same method next year. I'm also toying with the idea of doing a special reading through the Book of Psalms using Matthew Henry as my guide.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
What makes it your favorite? I've been focusing on Luke lately too and I almost caught myself saying the same thing!

I guess it's Luke's just-the-facts-ma'am approach - though he doesn't explain why Mary left Elizabeth to go home just as Elizabeth was about to give birth. Didn't Mary want to stick around to maybe help out with the birth and see the baby? Inquiring minds want to know!
 
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