March of the Penguins

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Craig

Puritan Board Senior
While I haven't seen this movie, I thought I'd warn parents with children.

We have a friend that went to see this movie...and while I don't expect all G rated movies to be happy go lucky, it sounds like it could be a little to intense for small children.

This is a documentary, so you see up close the struggle of the penguins. You will see a penguin freeze to death. You will also see a penguin pecked to death. Chilren were wailing in the theater, and our friend could hear at least one child look to their parents asking "why, why won't someone make this stop?"

It sounds like an amazing story, but children will get attached to these wonderful animals and may be horrified to see the harsh reality of the events. Just a heads up, parts of the movie will not be cutesy, and you may have to console your children.

[Edited on 8-6-2005 by Craig]
 

VirginiaHuguenot

Puritanboard Librarian
I saw this movie finally. The photography was wonderful and the information was fascinating, but I did not find it to be extraordinary or especially different than most PBS or Discovery channel documentaries (ex: it opens with a Carl Sagan-like statement about the age of the Antarctic; and it calls penguins who find a different mate every year "monogamous").

[Edited on 7-17-2006 by VirginiaHuguenot]
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
I saw it and own it on DVD. I think it's a great movie. I never saw that OP but it's a bit fantastic to say the least.

I saw it originally in a theater full of little kids and there wasn't a wailing child in the theater.
 

Semper Fidelis

2 Timothy 2:24-25
Staff member
Oh, I almost forgot the most horrific part of the whole thing:

My son (then 3 1/2) kept calling them PENGLINS.

Make it stop! Make it stop!!!
 

BJClark

Puritan Board Doctor
Craig,


My husband and I rented the movie, it was VERY good.

Like the other poster said, much like something they would see on the Discovery Channel or a PBS Documentary.

Besides the death of the penquins, you also see how they care for their young, and transfer the 'egg' from one parents flippers to the other and how the father penguin cares for the young while the mothers are out looking for food to bring back, and how difficult a trek it is for the mothers to do this.

And how all the fathers bunched together in a huge circle to protect themselves from the high winds and cold, and their need for each other in order to survive.

Just as documentaries have bad points about life, it also has some awesome aspects of how God created them, and how He created certain instincts into them to care for themselves and each other.
 

Craig

Puritan Board Senior
I was more or less simply saying what you should expect if you take your kids...If I saw that as a kid, I would have been horrified.

My wife and I were watching the Discovery Channel last week, and it was about hippos...there was this young hippo playing in the river and his mother was keeping an eye out for him. It was quite fascinating to see him play, and he was endearing...then a crocodile cornered the hippo, he knew he was done for, and his mother watched on knowing it was too late: the crocodile ripped the baby hippo apart.

Stuff like that catches me off gaurd...I can't explain it. I've always loved animals.
 

ServantOfKing

Puritan Board Freshman
I am 19 years old and I can honestly say I got teary-eyed in that movie. I got so attached to the cute little penguins!
When the eggs (or whatever they were) froze to death, we were talking about how it is kind of like a child dying in embryo. We found it interesting that while most scientists would consider those eggs to have life, they have no problem advocating human baby abortion.
 
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